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College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Summer 2020 Course Descriptions

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200-Level English Courses | 300-Level English Courses | 400-Level English Courses

ENG 202 Writing About Literature 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. Synchronous.

30273 MTWR 12:00-01:50 pm Lester, Mark M.

Down the Rabbit Hole: This course will focus on writing as an essential part of the process of critically engaging works of literature. Attention will be given to the formal or structural dimensions of the literary work as well as the subject matter. We will also explore ways in which cross-disciplinary critical analysis can illuminate the significance or meaning of a literary work and at the same time open up interesting and important non-literary modes of research. Writing-related topics include: developing a strong thesis, organizing the essay, writing concisely, and writing with precision. The title for this section of English 202 is the title of the first chapter of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Given the bizarre things that happen to Alice when she pursues a white rabbit dressed in a waistcoat down the hole into which it has disappeared, the expression down the rabbit hole has come to refer to any crossing over from a familiar or comfortable space, situation, or way of thinking to one that seems odd, nonsensical, fantastic, or disorienting. During the quarter, we will, accordingly, examine and write about four short novels that focus on such intriguing journeys: Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass; Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49; and Adolfo Bioy Casares’s The Invention of Morel.

EVALUATION: Short writing exercises and response papers; more fully developed “working papers”; three short essays.

TEXTS:

  • Donald Grey (ed.), Lewis Carroll (author), Alice in Wonderland (3rd Norton Critical Edition);
  • Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (Harper Perennial Modern Classics);
  • Adolfo Bioy Casares, The Invention of Morel (New York Review Books).

 

ENG 302 Technical Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101; requirement for Junior standing lifted in the summer. Prerequisites not enforced for Summer 2020.

30158 Bell, Michael Patrick

This summer will bring unique challenges to English 302, the English Department's course in applied professional communication. I’m trying to see this situation in which we all find ourselves as an opportunity, and I intend to provide you with as full a range of learning situations as any past students of 302 have enjoyed as well as new ones that the online environment affords us. I also hope that this situation, however new and untested it may be, will provide us with the chance to grow in our understanding of ourselves as participants in college learning. For myself, it is the chance to learn new techniques and really test myself as an effective instructor, even after over 20 years of teaching. For you all, given that online learning requires such a high degree of motivation and discipline, I’m hoping you reaffirm for yourselves why learning matters, what kind of student you can be at your best, and how vital you are as students in the overall college endeavor.

This summer, given how many of us are working from home, the core of the course will involve a collaborative writing project using Slack, which has become an industry standard for the purpose. You will therefore not only get practice in rendering professional documents on your own, but also the methods through which they are often prepared collaboratively in the working world. This project could be an online how-to manual, an online store, an instructional video, a game, a lifestyle guide, an app…there are many possibilities for you.

The basic goals of the course remain the same: it is an introduction to the field of professional communication and document design. Communicators in this discipline are above all focused on readers and users. They are experts in rendering complex information in clear terms that their audiences can understand. They write the instructions and manuals that help us assemble and use various products at home and at work. They translate complex scientific and technological concepts for a lay audience, preparing guides, brochures, catalogs, press releases and newsletters. They administer professional websites and social media presence for businesses. They write and design teaching materials, including handouts and textbooks. They may also write copy for advertisements, and deliver oral presentations at trade shows. More and more, “writing” in this field also includes a solid grasp of basic design principles and practices, and may include audio, video, and animation. You will emerge from the course with a grasp of the field, and a set of strategies and practices to carry forward into your professional writing tasks.

Grading is Pass/Fail with the option of a traditional letter grade. This course is asynchronous.

30178 MTWR 10:00-11:50 am McGuire, Simon Leonard

This writing intensive course invites you to explore what is technical about technical writing. Course projects ask you to analyze and create technical documents that relate to your academic, professional and social interests. Projects emphasize rhetorical analysis, document design, user testing, and the practical and cultural implications of your choices as a writer. Throughout the course, you’ll learn to re-imagine the page, to edit and revise documents for visual impact, and to view your readers as information users with specific needs. We will also examine and utilize fundamental concepts in technical writing such as readability/usability, page layout and visual rhetoric, and the importance of analyzing your audience before you write.

 

ENG 310 Seminar: The Long 19th Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. If you have taken ENG 310 or ENG 320, do not take ENG 310. This course is cross-listed with ENG 320. This course is asynchronous.

30898 Wise, Christopher

This course is entitled “The Long 19th Century” (not a title chosen by me); but, it was indeed a very “long century” if you happened to be an indigenous person who lived in Africa, India, the American West, etc. The 19th century, which has been dubbed “the golden age of racism,” was the crowning apex of the era of expanding European capital and imperialism. Already wealthy nations like England, France, Holland, and other powers increased their wealth multifold by conquering and colonizing lands belonging to the peoples of Africa, India, South America, Asia, and other places. Though it is not possible to study every nation’s literature during this era, it is possible to study particular cases in order to gain a better sense of what took place during this time. Our course in 19th century literature will therefore focus on the 19th century literature of France and West Africa during the era of imperial conquest. We will read the literature of Europeans who explored West Africa and produced the new literary genre of “The Timbuktu Narrative,” and we will also read the literature of those who stayed home and merely enjoyed the opulent wealth that was produced by the looting and plundering that took place. Finally, we will also read the literature of colonized peoples o understand how they experienced colonization.

Course Requirements: The format of this course will be totally asynchronous. Students will listen to video-lectures at their own pace and leisure, and then they will turn in their reading journals to me. They will also write a formal paper of 4-5 pages, take an essay exam, and create one video report to be viewed online by the rest of the class. Although this is a six-week class, students will also have the option of completing the course in nine weeks due to the flexibility gained from the course being delivered on-line. (Note: A digital copy of my book, Archive of the Umarian Tijaniyya, will be provided free of charge although hard copies are also available at cost.)

Texts:

  • Christopher Wise (ed), Archive of the Umarian Tijaniyya
  • Jean-Michel Dijan, The Manuscripts of Timbuktu
  • Gustave Flaubert, Three Tales and Flaubert In Egypt
  • Angel Flores (ed), The Anchor Anthology of French Poetry: From Nerval to Valéry in English Translation
  • Emile Zola, The Masterpiece
  • Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way

 

ENG 311 Seminar: The 20-21st Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 311 if you have already taken ENG 321 or 311. This course is cross-listed with ENG 321. This course is asynchronous.

30549 MTWR 12:00-01:50 pm Rivera, Lysa

Since the early twentieth century, images of and references to space, science, and technology have animated African-American art, literature, and culture. From W.E.B. Du Bois to Octavia Butler, black cultural workers have transformed science fiction—traditionally a pulp genre directed to and consumed by white, male adolescents—into a politicized space for the examination of fictions of science. In this course we will explore the history of African American speculative fiction (in both literature and, to a lesser extent, film) by tracing how the formal and thematic conventions of this genre excel at representing and contesting what Ishmael Reed has called the “far out” experience of being black in the United States.  We will strengthen our understanding of this cultural phenomenon by locating it within the contexts of African American political and intellectual history, postcolonial theory, and critical theories of race and ethnicity in the United States. In addition, we will study the concept of Afrofuturism and the relationship of African Americans to discourses of modernity, reason, and (post)humanism.  

This is a fully asynchronous course. There will be no synchronous coursework. You will never need to worry about logging on to your computer to meet virtually with the rest of the class at a specific time. You can complete all required assignments on your own time. That said, optional group Zoom meetings will also be available for students who want a vestige of that community experience! Assignments will consist of weekly reading discussion posts and one final essay due at the end of the term. Students will also have the option of submitting a hybrid critical/creative essay if they are so inclined. (This final project will be completed in stages – with one partial draft and one peer review so that you are not rushing to complete the final draft all at once.)

Texts:

  •  Pauline E. Hopkins: Of One Blood, or the Hidden Self (1902)
  •  George Schuyler: Black No More (1931)
  • Samuel Delany, Nova (1968)
  • Octavia Butler, Dawn (1987)

 

ENG 313 Critical Theories/Practices 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. This course is asynchronous.

30444 MTWR 10:00-11:50 am Hardman, Pam

Whenever you read or watch anything, talk to others, use technology, listen to music, play a game, and even dream, you are engaged in complex webs of meaning. In this course we will “read” these webs closely and critically, exploring how power and identity influence the meanings we produce and the meanings imposed on us. The goals of the course are to increase your abilities to critically interpret various texts and cultural phenomena, and to write about these interpretations, interweaving your own ideas with other theorists’ notions.

We’ll use the assigned readings as starting points for analyzing a variety of cultural products, such as literary texts, film, television, advertisements, technology, social institutions, and music. Most of the course will focus on theories articulated during the last half of the twentieth century, although we will place them in their historical contexts and discuss how they arose from previous ways of thinking.

For Summer 2020, this course will be offered online. You’ll have weekly deadlines, but can work at your own pace and will not have to “meet” online at any particular time. I’ll be available throughout the quarter for optional real-time conferencing.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assigned reading; participation in class discussions; one contextual meaning exercise; two explication/application papers; final exam.

TEXTS: Leitch et. al., eds., The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; Jeffrey Nealon and Susan Searls Giroux, The Theory Toolbox, 2nd edition.

 

ENG 320 Survey: The Long 19th Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. If you have taken ENG 310 or ENG 320, do not take ENG 320. This course is cross-listed with ENG 310. This course is asynchronous.

30845 Wise, Christopher

This course is entitled “The Long 19th Century” (not a title chosen by me); but, it was indeed a very “long century” if you happened to be an indigenous person who lived in Africa, India, the American West, etc. The 19th century, which has been dubbed “the golden age of racism,” was the crowning apex of the era of expanding European capital and imperialism. Already wealthy nations like England, France, Holland, and other powers increased their wealth multifold by conquering and colonizing lands belonging to the peoples of Africa, India, South America, Asia, and other places. Though it is not possible to study every nation’s literature during this era, it is possible to study particular cases in order to gain a better sense of what took place during this time. Our course in 19th century literature will therefore focus on the 19th century literature of France and West Africa during the era of imperial conquest. We will read the literature of Europeans who explored West Africa and produced the new literary genre of “The Timbuktu Narrative,” and we will also read the literature of those who stayed home and merely enjoyed the opulent wealth that was produced by the looting and plundering that took place. Finally, we will also read the literature of colonized peoples o understand how they experienced colonization.

Course Requirements: The format of this course will be totally asynchronous. Students will listen to video-lectures at their own pace and leisure, and then they will turn in their reading journals to me. They will also write a formal paper of 4-5 pages, take an essay exam, and create one video report to be viewed online by the rest of the class. Although this is a six-week class, students will also have the option of completing the course in nine weeks due to the flexibility gained from the course being delivered on-line. (Note: A digital copy of my book, Archive of the Umarian Tijaniyya, will be provided free of charge although hard copies are also available at cost.)

Texts:

  • Christopher Wise (ed), Archive of the Umarian Tijaniyya
  • Jean-Michel Dijan, The Manuscripts of Timbuktu
  • Gustave Flaubert, Three Tales and Flaubert In Egypt
  • Angel Flores (ed), The Anchor Anthology of French Poetry: From Nerval to Valéry in English Translation
  • Emile Zola, The Masterpiece
  • Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way

 

ENG 321 Survey: The 20-21st Centuries 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. If you have taken ENG 311 or ENG 321, do not take ENG 321. This course is cross-listed with ENG 311. This course is asynchronous.

30899 MTWR 12:00-01:50 pm Rivera, Lysa

Since the early twentieth century, images of and references to space, science, and technology have animated African-American art, literature, and culture. From W.E.B. Du Bois to Octavia Butler, black cultural workers have transformed science fiction—traditionally a pulp genre directed to and consumed by white, male adolescents—into a politicized space for the examination of fictions of science. In this course we will explore the history of African American speculative fiction (in both literature and, to a lesser extent, film) by tracing how the formal and thematic conventions of this genre excel at representing and contesting what Ishmael Reed has called the “far out” experience of being black in the United States.  We will strengthen our understanding of this cultural phenomenon by locating it within the contexts of African American political and intellectual history, postcolonial theory, and critical theories of race and ethnicity in the United States. In addition, we will study the concept of Afrofuturism and the relationship of African Americans to discourses of modernity, reason, and (post)humanism.  

This is a fully asynchronous course. There will be no synchronous coursework. You will never need to worry about logging on to your computer to meet virtually with the rest of the class at a specific time. You can complete all required assignments on your own time. That said, optional group Zoom meetings will also be available for students who want a vestige of that community experience! Assignments will consist of weekly reading discussion posts and one final essay due at the end of the term. Students will also have the option of submitting a hybrid critical/creative essay if they are so inclined. (This final project will be completed in stages – with one partial draft and one peer review so that you are not rushing to complete the final draft all at once.)

Texts:

  •  Pauline E. Hopkins: Of One Blood, or the Hidden Self (1902)
  •  George Schuyler: Black No More (1931)
  • Samuel Delany, Nova (1968)
  • Octavia Butler, Dawn (1987)

 

ENG 347 Studies in Young Adult Lit 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 or instructor permission. This course is asynchronous.

30096 Sheahan, Annmarie

ENG 347: Studies in Young Adult Literature (Sheahan)

With a focus on identity, community, and agency, this course will familiarize you with multiple genres and mediums of literature written for teens and young adults (age 14-20) and will provide a survey of texts geared toward adolescent readers. Our work will explore texts by YA authors across various genres as we consider the relevance of young adult literature for both adolescent and adult readers.Together, we will read books by diverse writers and respond to these writers in diverse ways, privileging adolescent voice in understanding the development of identity and agency across varied communities and experiences. Throughout the course we will consider whose voices get heard in YA literature and how those voices offer insight into teen lives and experiences. We will also explore YA literature as a vehicle for social justice, equity, and inclusion. As such, course texts, assignments, and discussions will be framed by critical perspectives acknowledging the importance of adolescent voice in unpacking systems of oppression and in imagining and creating more hopeful, equitable futures.  

In lieu of a traditional final, your culminating project for this course will take the form of a multi-genre, multi-modal creative project centered on a particular character’s path toward identity development, agency, and change.  

Note: This course will be taught in a predominantly asynchronous format, meaning we will not “meet” during an allotted class time.  However, you will be required to complete your mid-term and final presentations in small group zoom meetings. As we get closer to these dates, your group and I will work together to figure out days and times these particular weeks that work for everyone.  Optional zoom discussion meetings will also be available weekly for those who wish to attend.

Tentative Assignments:

  • Ongoing reader response blog
  • Miscellaneous writing responses
  • Artistic/aesthetic responses w/artist’s statement
  • Zoom blitz presentations: Graphic novel close-read
  • Multi-genre/multi-modal final project and zoom presentation

Required Texts:

  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (Benjamin Alire Sáenz)
  • The Poet X (Elizabeth Acevedo)
  • Monster (Walter Dean Myers) OR Allegedly (Tiffany D. Jackson)
  • They Called Us Enemy (George Takei)
  • #NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women (Lisa Charleyboy and MaryBeth Leatherdale)
  • The Book Thief (Markus Zusak) OR The Fountains of Silence (Ruta Sepetys)

 

 

ENG 350 Intro to Creative Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.

30090 MTWR 12:00-01:50 pm Yeasting, Jeanne Ellen

This introductory creative writing course will focus on writing and revising original poetry and creative nonfiction.  Students will read and study the craft of range of poets and nonfiction writers, and use their texts as catalysts for generating and revising their own work.  We’ll study the work of some earlier practitioners, as well as contemporary authors. Class will be a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises, and workshops.

Assignments: Assignments include considerable reading of writing model poems and creative nonfiction; weekly writing and revising of original poetry and creative nonfiction; giving detailed peer feedback, including written feedback letters; and completing a Final project.  Students may be required to work on a collaborative project and/or attend outside literary events.

Evaluation:  Based primarily on active, attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments, including a Final Project.

Texts:  All e-book versions welcomed!

  • Required text: The Poet’s Companion, edited by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux.  W.W. Norton. Print: ISBN: 978-0393316544; also available in Kindle version
  • In Short, edited by Judith Kitchen and Mary Paumier Jones.  W.W. Norton. ISBN: 978-0393314922

 

This class will meet synchronously 1-2 times a week.

 

ENG 351 Intro to Fiction Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. This course is asynchronous.

30143 Westhoff, Kami Dawn Marie

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

 

ENG 353 Introduction to Poetry Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.

30734 MTWR 10:00-11:50 am Shipley, Ely

This course focuses on the practice of reading and writing poetry. While the primary concern is student writing, we work from the basis that in order to become better writers, we also must become better readers. We will explore a range of poetic traditions and contemporary developments and spend the quarter reading, writing, and discussing poetry through focusing on elements such as metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, line, and dramatic tension. You will be responsible for not only submitting original work, but also for offering thoughtful observations to each work discussed. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

This course is synchronous.

 

ENG 364 Introduction to Film Studies 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. This course is synchronous.

30737 MTWR 02:00-03:50 pm Prichard, Tony Alan

The course covers the key concepts in film studies. The basic terms and concepts regarding the production, theorization, and analysis of film will be introduced.

The viewings in the course will provide look variety of films throughout the history of cinema in order to practice employing the terms and concepts.

 

ENG 370 Introduction to Language 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. This course is synchronous.

30121 MTWR 02:00-03:50 pm McDonald, Catherine

This course is an introduction to the wonder and nature of language. Course content includes a survey of approaches used to probe, wonder about, and understand language, including the branches of linguistics called phonology, morphology, syntax, and stylistics. Questions about gender and language, cultural prejudices about accents and dialects, and speculative ideas about the role of language in shaping thinking and identity—all of these are topics in English 370. We’ll see that while many aspects of language are rule-governed phenomena that can be studied with mathematical precision, others are as loose and ephemeral as our sense of ourselves and our understanding of experience. No wonder, then, that philosophers and computer-scientists, mathematicians and poets, all find a common subject in language.

Course work will include regular homework exercises, project/tests, and outside readings. Lively participation is required as part of the course.

Text: How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction, 3rd Ed. by Anne Curzan and Michael Adams.

 

ENG 406 Topics:Critical/Culturl Theory 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. This course is cross-listed with ENG 464.

31099 MTWR 10:00-11:50 am Dietrich, Dawn Y.

Post-Millennial Film, New Materialism, and Studies in Affect: This course explores a range of post-millennial films (2010 and after), characterized by a response to technology’s ability to shape and redefine human subjectivity and identity. Harkening back to early cinema’s fascination with form, these recent films are distinct, in terms of the ways they utilize film technique and industry conventions to create a highly mediated cinematic experience. Moving beyond conventional narrative construction, these films create an interface between the film text and our daily interactions with smart technology, mobile and GPS systems, and artificial intelligence. The selected films, from varying levels of commercial cinema, utilize the filmic medium to create affective responses in a variety of contexts—with the goal of breaking down preconceived notions about how human subjectivity and identity are shifting in our current age of ubiquitous computing.  

Specifically, the movies experiment with film form and conventions to develop material metaphors that demonstrate a form of visual argumentation, mediated relationships between human and non-human actors, and the extension of the human sensorium into virtual strata. Moving beyond the optical sensation of film, many of these movies highlight the affective experience of watching film, including the haptic responses that come from an embodied perspective. We will look at reception spaces in an expanded sense—from physical spaces dependent upon projectors and screens to “virtual spaces” that come from fluid immersion in TV, laptop, or handheld devices.  Highly attuned to the embodied experience of viewers, these films privilege the body, senses, perceptive modalities, tactile, affective, and sensory motor perceptions in deeply creative ways.  Thus, the course will focus on new films in the context of affective and new materialist theories.

Content Warning: Some of the films in the course deals explicitly with sexual violence, rape, racism, and sexism. Feel free to talk with me, if you want to know what to expect with each film and whether this course will work for you.

Course Expectations and Evaluation: In this course, I will be teaching you how to perform media-specific analysis of film and digital video within the post-millennial context. We will be reading contemporary film theory, which attempts to situate our current cultural moment in the larger stream of cinema history; and you will be working with the films closely to provide readings of their content and form. We’ll meet once a week for an hour on Zoom, and we’ll carry on a lively discussion on Canvas, utilizing written posts, short videos, and/or podcasts. I’m organizing the course like an intimate movie club that gathers regularly for film discussions, which I hope you enjoy! My goal is to create an informal discussion format where any questions and comments can be asked of the group, and we can have a fun time talking about fabulous movies.

Film Access: Films are available in Wilson Library, but depending on whether the library is open or not this summer, it may be necessary to ensure your own access to the films through a streaming service.

Selected films from among the following:

  • Her, Spike Jonze (2013)
  • Locke, Stephen Knight (2013)
  • High Life, Claire Denis (2019)
  • Get Out, Jordan Peele (2017)
  • The Beaches of Agnes, Agnes Varda (2008)
  • Tim’s Vermeer, Raymond Teller (2013)
  • Under the Skin, Jonathan Glazer (2013)
  • The Rider, Chloé Zhao (2017)
  • Another Earth, Brit Marling (2011)
  • It Follows, David Mitchell (2015)
  • 13th, Ava DuVernay (2016)
  • Ex Machina, Alex Garland (2015)
  • Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch (2013)
  • Nightcrawler, Dan Gilroy (2014)
  • Mad Max: Fury Road, George Miller (2015)
  • Enemy, Denis Villeneuve (2013)
  • I Origins, Brit Marling (2014)

Required Texts

  • Film Theory:  An Introduction Through the Senses, Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener
  • Carnal Thoughts:  Embodiment and Moving Image Culture, Vivian Sobchack

 

ENG 423 Maj Auth: Creolizing the Brontes 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites not enforced for Summer 2020. WP3. This is a fully asynchronous course.

30735 MTWR 08:00-09:50 am Anderson, Katherine J.

Few nineteenth-century novels have the cultural staying power of the work of major Victorian authors Charlotte and Emily Brontë, two preacher’s daughters writing from the lonely moors of Yorkshire. Almost two hundred years later, we remain obsessed with their most famous creations: Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. These two novels are more than the period-piece romances that Hollywood often makes them out to be, but what gives them their global resonance? At last count, Jane Eyre has been translated into at least 57 languages, at least 593 times. Both novels have also provoked or inspired postcolonial retellings that grapple further with their intersectional depictions of gender, class, and race-based oppressions under the shadow of the British Empire.

This class examines the “creolization” of the Brontës’ novels, attending to histories of empire, imperialism, and globalization in direct relation to literary history and genealogy, and, conversely, to the importance of imperialism and globalization in literary history. Sociologist Robin Cohen defines creolization as the process in which “participants select particular elements from incoming or inherited cultures, endow these with meanings different from those they possessed in the original cultures, and then creatively merge these to create new varieties that supersede the prior forms.” Alongside Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, we will read novels by authors from the Caribbean who speak back to, reinterpret, double-down on, or enter into conversation with the Brontës’ depictions of slavery and Western colonialism, creating new meanings and hybrid literary forms, such as the Caribbean Gothic, as they do so.

This is a fully asynchronous course. There will be no synchronous coursework. That means at no time in this course will you need to be in front of a computer with adequate connectivity at a specific time to meet with me or the class. You can do all of the work on your own time. Assignments will consist of weekly reading response discussion posts and an 8-10 page essay (you’ll complete a 5-7 page essay first as a draft of sorts, and then build that into your 8-10 page final draft with my feedback).

Texts:

  • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
  • Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights
  • Maryse Condé, Windward Heights
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea

In addition, we will watch and analyze the following films:

  • Andrea Arnold, Wuthering Heights (2011)
  • Cary Joji Fukanaga, Jane Eyre (2011)
  • Brendan Maher, Wide Sargasso Sea (2006)
  • Jacques Tourneur, I Walked with a Zombie (1943)

 

ENG 436 The Structure of English 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Pre-reqs not enforced for summer session. Online.

30204 TBD TBD Lobeck, Anne C.

Rather than correcting each other and learning ‘proper grammar’ in this class, we discover, by exploring your own intuitive knowledge of English, how this fascinating, complex and ever changing language works. Come and join us!

 

ENG 459 Editing and Publishing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. This course is asynchronous.

30477 MTWR 12:00-01:50 pm Colen, Elizabeth Jane

This course will give students an overview of professional editing and publishing practices and history across a variety of genres and professional venues. Students will conduct an analysis and assessment of their own writing and publishing aims and engage in exercises and assignments geared towards individual goals. To that end, we will read, respond to, analyze, and try our hand at composing and refining a wide range of essential texts, including cover letters and query letters, synopses, back cover copy, blurbs, bios, book reviews, and interviews. Additionally, students will exercise and cultivate research, copyediting, and proofreading skills and closely examine how an author may utilize and refine grammar, syntax, and other elements of style to improve their writing and begin to take part in wider literary community and conversations.

 

ENG 460 Multi-GenreWrit:ArtofCompost 5cr

Notes: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer.

30736 MTWR 02:00-03:50 pm Patton, Christopher

When you make compost you break down old forms to make new forms. From banana peels and lawn clippings you grow a lemon tree. From street signs and Twitter feeds you grow a poem or a lyric essay. In this class you’ll turn fairytales inside-out. You’ll burrow wormwise through your old discarded drafts. What you won’t do is stare at a blank page or screen trying to figure out what on earth to say. Your life’s already a perfect poem, a perfect story, you just need to compose it a bit. This summer, the class will be retuned for online delivery, so expect to feed and care for a blog, play games of Google Translate Telephone, and make object poems out of household recycling you then film with your smartphone. Texts will include Anne Carson’s translations of Sappho, Emily Dickinson’s envelope poems, Tom Phillips’s theatrical erasure of a Victorian novel, Ronald Johnson’s erasure of Paradise Lost, John Berger on seeing the very old very newly, and such delights as the interwebs pour out.

 

ENG 464 Topics in Film Studies 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Prerequisites lifted in the Summer. This course is cross-listed with ENG 406.

31100 MTWR 10:00-11:50 am Dietrich, Dawn Y.

Post-Millennial Film, New Materialism, and Studies in Affect: This course explores a range of post-millennial films (2010 and after), characterized by a response to technology’s ability to shape and redefine human subjectivity and identity. Harkening back to early cinema’s fascination with form, these recent films are distinct, in terms of the ways they utilize film technique and industry conventions to create a highly mediated cinematic experience. Moving beyond conventional narrative construction, these films create an interface between the film text and our daily interactions with smart technology, mobile and GPS systems, and artificial intelligence. The selected films, from varying levels of commercial cinema, utilize the filmic medium to create affective responses in a variety of contexts—with the goal of breaking down preconceived notions about how human subjectivity and identity are shifting in our current age of ubiquitous computing.  

Specifically, the movies experiment with film form and conventions to develop material metaphors that demonstrate a form of visual argumentation, mediated relationships between human and non-human actors, and the extension of the human sensorium into virtual strata. Moving beyond the optical sensation of film, many of these movies highlight the affective experience of watching film, including the haptic responses that come from an embodied perspective. We will look at reception spaces in an expanded sense—from physical spaces dependent upon projectors and screens to “virtual spaces” that come from fluid immersion in TV, laptop, or handheld devices.  Highly attuned to the embodied experience of viewers, these films privilege the body, senses, perceptive modalities, tactile, affective, and sensory motor perceptions in deeply creative ways.  Thus, the course will focus on new films in the context of affective and new materialist theories.

Content Warning: Some of the films in the course deals explicitly with sexual violence, rape, racism, and sexism. Feel free to talk with me, if you want to know what to expect with each film and whether this course will work for you.

Course Expectations and Evaluation: In this course, I will be teaching you how to perform media-specific analysis of film and digital video within the post-millennial context. We will be reading contemporary film theory, which attempts to situate our current cultural moment in the larger stream of cinema history; and you will be working with the films closely to provide readings of their content and form. We’ll meet once a week for an hour on Zoom, and we’ll carry on a lively discussion on Canvas, utilizing written posts, short videos, and/or podcasts. I’m organizing the course like an intimate movie club that gathers regularly for film discussions, which I hope you enjoy! My goal is to create an informal discussion format where any questions and comments can be asked of the group, and we can have a fun time talking about fabulous movies.

Film Access: Films are available in Wilson Library, but depending on whether the library is open or not this summer, it may be necessary to ensure your own access to the films through a streaming service.

Selected films from among the following:

  • Her, Spike Jonze (2013)
  • Locke, Stephen Knight (2013)
  • High Life, Claire Denis (2019)
  • Get Out, Jordan Peele (2017)
  • The Beaches of Agnes, Agnes Varda (2008)
  • Tim’s Vermeer, Raymond Teller (2013)
  • Under the Skin, Jonathan Glazer (2013)
  • The Rider, Chloé Zhao (2017)
  • Another Earth, Brit Marling (2011)
  • It Follows, David Mitchell (2015)
  • 13th, Ava DuVernay (2016)
  • Ex Machina, Alex Garland (2015)
  • Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch (2013)
  • Nightcrawler, Dan Gilroy (2014)
  • Mad Max: Fury Road, George Miller (2015)
  • Enemy, Denis Villeneuve (2013)
  • I Origins, Brit Marling (2014)

Required Texts

  • Film Theory:  An Introduction Through the Senses, Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener
  • Carnal Thoughts:  Embodiment and Moving Image Culture, Vivian Sobchack