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College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Spring 2021 Course Descriptions

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100-Level English Courses | 200-Level English Courses | 300-Level English Courses | 400-Level English Courses | 500-Level (Graduate) English Courses |

ENG 101 Writing Your Way Through WWU 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites:May not be taken concurrently with ENG 100.

A writing course designed to prepare students for college-level creative, critical, and reflective writing. Because writing looks and works differently in different contexts, this course teaches the rhetorical competencies that students need to write across multiple disciplines. The course introduces students both to the processes of building and analyzing ideas, and to ways of communicating those ideas in context-specific genres for targeted audiences. This course has the immediate goal of preparing students to succeed in their writing at Western, but it will also serve them personally and professionally. Students needing to satisfy Block A of the communications section of the General University Requirements, which ENG 101 does, are required to do so prior to completion of 45 credits. Students with a 4 or 5 AP score are encouraged to take this class so they can learn to adapt their test-taking skills to college coursework. Note that English 101 is being offered in several online modalities, including fully asynchronous and blended sections. OVERRIDES / CAPACITY OVERRIDES ARE NEVER GRANTED FOR ENGLISH 101. English 101 is capped at 24 students due to the constraints of the physical space. Please see the English 101 website for more information about ENG 101.

ENG 201 Writ in Hum: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 or 4/5 AP English Language Exam.

22916 T 12:00-01:15 pm, R asynchronous. Cushman, Jeremy W.

To best get at some of the imaginative, practical, and ethical work happening within the humanities, we’ll explore the contested ways that Christianity emerged in and around Asia Minor. Then (fast-forwarding more than 2,000 years!) we'll pay super close attention to a few ways the religion is playing out in our contemporary U.S. contexts. What that means is that, together, we’ll build projects about the relationship between ancient Christianity and the U.S. from the the frameworks of long-standing disciplines like History, Philosophy, Rhetoric, Classical Languages, Art, and so on.

Ultimately, the course is dedicated to helping you ask better questions of the differing worlds in which you act. Hopefully, it'll challenge you as a thinker, reader, and designer within the ever expanding methodologies that come out of the humanities. Learning to read and write and design effectively and powerfully in differing contexts and with differing tools will benefit you regardless of the life you’re chasing after. Simply put, good writing, in whatever form it takes, can make lots happen.


What You Need:

  1. Daily Attention to our Canvas Site
  2. Some imagination and courage
  3. An account on medium.com

 

ENG 202 Writing About Literature 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. BCOM.

20140 MWF 08:30-09:50 am, shortened class sessions. Dugger, Julie

A writing course designed to help students develop the skills of close reading and careful analysis of literary texts, with particular attention to how language, style, and form contribute to a text's social or political claims. To give the course an emphasis for discussion, this section will consider what happens when you tell the same story in different genres from different perspectives by looking at retellings of Homer’s Odyssey. Readings will include the Wilson Odyssey, Walcott’s Omeros, and Atwood’s Penelopiad, as well as other short selected adaptations. Course requirements include discussion, short informal writing assignments, two 3-4 page formal papers, and a paper rewrite incorporating a critical source.

20272 MWF 10:00-11:20 am McDonald, Catherine

Why are we drawn to fiction and film? What stories do they tell us (or leave out) of our daily lives? Assuming that sites of everyday experience are worthy of intellectual analysis, this section of English 202 will look at fictional portrayals—not of the heroic and epic—but of the everyday workings of people’s lives. We will read, analyze, and write about fiction that has been made into film.

For instance, you’ve all seen the movie Princess Bride, but have you read the book? Why is there a second story in the background?—what is William Goldman saying? What is going on when Charlie Kaufman turns Susan Orleans’ charming short story “The Orchid Thief” into a murder plot where a main character gets eaten by an alligator?

Another question about a course called Writing about Literature is Who writes about literature, and why? We will look at an array of spaces where people post/publish their analysis of imaginary texts. By the end of the quarter you’ll not only be able to compose the assignments that literature professors require, you will put your voice into the conversation of those reflecting on fiction turned into film.

20788 W 01:00-02:20 pm, MF asynchronous. Dietrich, Dawn Y.

This course will explore how we write about literary texts in a multimodal age --with specific attention paid to one graphic novel and its transmedial incarnations: Watchmen. We’ll analyze Watchmen’s word-image art and sequential graphic narrative within a medium-specific context, observing the transmedial texts this work inspired. How can we be attentive to close textual reading and medium specificity while observing the ways in which a narrative can be realized through various media and/or modalities? What happens to a “story” as it mutates across media, including film, TV, comics, and videogames? This course will prepare you to find interesting lines of inquiry into graphic literature and to produce compelling writing that features a close reading of the text, combined with attention to the medium itself.

Assignments

You will have the opportunity to write multi-modal blogs that feature a close analysis of Watchmen though a medium-specific lens.

Required Texts

  • Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud
  • Watchmen, Alan Moore

 

Required Viewing

  • Watchmen: Tales of the Black Freighter, Daniel DelPurgatorio and Mike Smith
  • Watchmen: Under the Hood, Eric Matthies
  • Watchmen: The Stop-Motion Comic, Jake Hughes
  • Watchmen (film, directed by Zack Snyder)
  • Watchmen (HBO series, Damon Lindelof et al.)

 

Optional

  • The Mindscape of Alan Moore, DeZ Vylenz
  • Before Watchmen prequel series, featuring diverse artists

 

20794 F 02:30-03:50 pm, MW asynchronous. Weed, Katie

Satire & Social Change: Satire can make us laugh, wince, and question what we accept. In this section of 202, we will examine satirical literature dealing in particular with themes of limits and boundaries. We’ll explore satire in multiple genres and forms--sampling works from a broad range of time periods and cultures--and probe ways satire can complicate our views, sometimes effecting change and others impeding it.

Studying novels, short stories, poetry, and film, we will hone skills in close reading and critical analysis of literary texts via various theoretical lenses, paying special attention to how language, style, and form contribute to social and/or political claims. Coursework will include extensive informal writing, group work, some creative writing, and multi-draft critical essays with a focused, arguable thesis supported by thoughtful sequences of claims and carefully selected textual evidence.

20795 T 10:00-11:30 am, R asynchronous. Heim, Stefania F.

Emily Dickinson once wrote to a friend that if after reading a book, “I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” Franz Kafka asserted, “I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound or stab us.” Audre Lorde called poetry “a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change.” In this course we will ask some answerable as well as some unanswerable questions. What is literature? How does it work? What happens when we read it? Why do we love it or hate it? What does it have to do with our experiences of living? What does it have to do with large social and political forces? How do we construct our opinions about it, about the things that happen within it? How can we speak to each other productively about it? How can we analyze it and make arguments about it? In pursuit of answers, we will read widely across short fiction, poetry, and some hybrid forms. And we will write constantly: formal analyses and essays as well as drafts, explorations, experiments, lists, responses, and questions.

21293 TR 12:00-01:50 pm Goebel, Bruce A.

In this course, you will engage in analytical reading of postmodern literature, video, music, and other art forms and write personal, creative, and academic responses to those texts. We will pay particular attention to the authors’/artists’ choices in terms of form and style, exploring how form and style contribute to the viewpoint or argument of the text. For the formal writing assignments, you will produce a number of drafts, participate in peer writing workshops, and attend instructor-student conferences.

22463 TR 02:00-03:00 pm Rivera, Lysa

English 202 gives students practice in developing and honing their close reading and analytical skills to write effectively about literary texts. As we read and discuss the literature, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which form (language, style, narrative structure) creates meaning. Our focus this quarter will center on African American literature after 1945 and it will include texts from across multiple genres, including short-stories, novels, and poetry.

 

ENG 214 Shakespeare 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: HUM

20443 TR 10:00-11:50 am Lester, Mark M.

In this course we will explore how our experiences enable us to interpret Shakespeare, how performance or enactment necessitates interpretation, and at the same time how the works themselves have informed or influenced our experience. While our focus will be on what might be called the presence of Shakespeare in the contemporary world, we will also consider the historical situation in which the plays were written and performed. Special attention will be given to story, theme, language, and character.

Evaluation: Midterm and final exams; reading quizzes; film/performance review, participation.

Texts:

  • The Arden Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet (ISBN 9781903436912)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: Richard III (ISBN: 9781903436899)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: King Lear (ISBN: 9781903436592)
  • The Arden Shakespeare: The Tempest (ISBN 9781408133477)

 

ENG 215 British Literature 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: HUM

22071 ASYNC Anderson, Katherine J.

Monster Fiction: All cultures create monster stories. Monsters help humans articulate and then deal with major social changes and the accompanying anxieties. This course will investigate the rising cultural significance of monstrosity in some of the most important fiction and poetry published in Britain during the nineteenth century. We’ll also fast-forward a bit to consider two later British iterations of monstrosity – one in the twentieth century (dystopian fiction) and one in the twenty-first century (the haunted house itself as monster) – that build upon the literary innovations developed in nineteenth-century monster fictions. The nineteenth century was an age of change and challenges to established cultural norms in Britain and beyond: the Industrial and Darwinian Revolutions, the abolition of slavery, colonial rebellion, and the emergence of women’s rights, among others. Amidst these public changes, individuals struggled to maintain their sense of identity, dealing with the private and psychological changes chronicled in the literature of the period. How could the self – and how could the nation – maintain a coherent and stable sense of identity?

Throughout the quarter, we’ll consider how each of our texts use the figure of the monster to grapple with cultural – and individual – changes and fears. Some of the questions we will consider include: In what ways do monsters teach us what it means to be “human,” or even more simply, how to behave? How does British literature use the monster to mark territory as either culturally acceptable or socially dangerous? What are the fears and desires embodied in monsters, and how does the monster transform in response to changing cultural demands? Ultimately, what can these British monsters teach us about ourselves?

Course Objectives:
Western’s General University Requirement (GUR) courses embody the belief that a liberal arts and sciences education enables people to lead fuller and more interesting lives, to perceive and to understand more of the world around and within themselves, and to participate more intelligently and deliberately in shaping that world. ENG 215 is a Humanities GUR course. Humanities GURs provide you with a chance to practice critical, historical, and aesthetic approaches as a means to explore how people experience and document their lives, examine and question the values of their societies, and creatively engage with their world.

My primary objective in ENG 215, then, is to use the figure of the monster to give you a broader knowledge of British literature over the course of the nineteenth century and beyond, and the ways in which people used that literature to experience and document their lives, examine and question their society’s values, fears, and norms, and creatively engage with their world. By the end of the quarter, you will have a better understanding of some of the significant literary movements and generic innovations that emerged in the period and how they overlap (Romanticism and aestheticism, for example), as well as a better understanding of the cultural issues, fears, and desires that emerged in said literature, in relation to things like gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, scientific innovations, violence, and the family. Along the way, you’ll learn a literary history of the Gothic as a genre, and the ways it evolved in the nineteenth century and beyond.

In addition to introducing you to the college-level study of British literature, this course will help you begin to cultivate reading and writing skills that can be applied to various critical situations. In our discussions of literature, we’ll focus on the relationship between form and function: the ways in which what is said connects to how it’s communicated (and why this matters). At the end of the quarter, you will have developed a working knowledge of literary interpretation, the ability to think critically about fictional texts, forms, and genres, and the ability to formulate and support thoughtful arguments based on careful analysis.

Student Learning Objectives (what you’ll get out of this class):

  1. Increased ability to identify basic generic and formal characteristics in British literature. 
  2. Increased ability to perform critical analysis of literary works across genres.
  3. Increased ability to compare and contrast texts of different forms or genres productively.
  4. Increased ability to effectively express interpretations through writing.
  5. Increased ability to relate literature to its historical context as well as to the current contemporary moment.


Warning: This course incorporates mature themes. Some of the texts we’ll read include representations of graphic violence and/or sexuality, and may be emotionally troubling. Please be certain you are willing and able to discuss this material in a mature and respectful way.

Texts in this class will likely include:

  • George Orwell, 1984
  • Helen Oyeyemi, White is for Witching
  • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
  • Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  • H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau
  • Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • A few required short readings (stories and/or poems), which will be available as PDFs on Canvas.

 

ENG 236 Asian American Literatures 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: BCGM

22072 TR 08:00-09:50 am Yu, Ning

Some of the most significant and powerful writings in contemporary American literature are produced by Asian Americans, people who, or whose parents or grand parents, came from China, Japan, Korea, India, the Philippines and other Asian countries.  This course will focus on two major events in Asian American history, the construction of the transcontinental railroad and the internment camps during W.W.II.  Using both written and visual texts, students learn to see and criticize how ideology permeates texts, how contesting voices in the texts either reinforce or challenge the established oppressive social structure, and how cultural ignorance and misunderstanding may worsen ideological conflicts.  Stereotypical presentations of Asian Americans as "Other" in popular culture are juxtaposed with the self-portrayals by serious Asian American writers who search for individual as well as group identities.  We will start with Gary Okihiro's excellent theory on "margins and mainstreams," and then we will study five written and four visual texts closely, looking for patterns of presentation.  Eventually, students may want to change the cliche of "the big melting pot" into a less violent metaphor, a huge salad bowl, for example, and they will learn to appreciate the truly diverse nature, especially the bitter sweetness of an Asian American flavor.  6 quizzes, 3 discussion questions written and submitted on three different texts, with two full pages of written response to each question.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Careful reading.  Read thoroughly and thoughtfully all assignments for each class meeting as scheduled, attend class regularly, recommend discussion topics and participate actively in class discussion and exercises.  13% of grade. I will run this large class as a discussion forum, and therefore student participation is of vital importance.  If a student has more than three unexcused absences from class, his/her final grade will not be higher than C no matter how well he or she does in other areas of the class.  Your thoughtful response to questions written by your peers are especially important in this area.
  2. Take a series of 6 quizzes on the reading assignments. 7% for each quiz, 42% of total  grade for all the quizzes.  The quizzes are mostly factual to make sure that you’ve read the texts carefully..
  3. At three different times in the quarter, you are required to write a thought-provoking question on a particular reading assignment.  When it is your turn, you will post your question on the blackboard by eight the night before the class meets.  In class, for about ten minutes, you’ll lead the discussion of your questions.  These questions must be insightful and thought-provoking so as to generate lively discussions.  To do this well, you are required to write two full pages of response to your own question. You should  NOT post the written response on the blackboard but will submit it to the instructor after class.  As the process will be repeated by each student three times, you will be submitting 3 two-page responses through the whole quarter.  Your question should be open-ended, inviting your peers to ask further questions and in your attempt to answer those questions you lead the discussion into a higher, more sophisticated level.  You are expected to be the authoritative expert when you’re leading, so it’s a good idea to do some outside research. 10 % of grade for each question/response; a total of 30%.
  4. We will view 6 films during the quarter, for the first five of which, you are required to identify two concepts (for example, margin/main-stream, orientalism/hegemony, men/women, civilization/ wilderness, reason/emotion, superior/inferior, us/them, yellow/white, nature/construct, identity/role, presence/absence) that are particularly relevant to the understanding of a part of the plot, of a character, or of motifs in the film.  Be prepared to explain the relevance in class to your peers and instructor. Write it down and submit it to the instructor at the end of our planned discussion of the film.  If you somehow missed a class meeting, you must view the film on your own and submit your note in the instructor’s office to make sure that that part of grade is entered into the computer. 3% each; totally 15%.  The written notes will be checked, but not graded.

 

ENG 301 Wrtg Stds: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101; junior status; or instructor permission. WP3. Major restrictions lift on February 26th, at 4:30pm.

20075 MW 08:30-09:45 am, F asynchronous. Qualley, Donna Jeanne

Dear 2020: The Year in Open Letters and Mixed Tapes: A Rhetorical Remix

Publics commence with the moment of attention. The events of 2020 called many kinds of publics and counter publics into being. Covid, masks, social distancing, travel bans, vaccines, Dr Fauci. Racial justice, BLM protests, George Floyd. Unemployment, business closures, stimulus packages, street dining. Election campaigns, Joe Biden, Georgia, voter fraud (no). Capital insurrection, impeachment (2). National Guard, inauguration, Kamala Harris, Amanda Gorman. Zoom. Zoom. Zoom.

In this section of English 301, we’ll focus our writing on the past year, roughly calculated from the time the university shut down at the end of March 2020 until the end of March 2021, marking the one-year anniversary of our shift to remote learning. Our primary vehicle for this retrospective will be the open letter, a genre that has a dual audience. Open letters are typically addressed to a specific person, group, entity or even “thing,” but they are intended for circulation to wider publics. These letters are written by individuals, groups, organizations, and companies to serve many participatory purposes: To respond, to explain, to question, to reflect, to move, to advise, to opine, to critique, to praise, to blame, to ridicule, to parody, to persuade, to protest, to incite, and to rant. However, all open letters share one thing in common. They are documents, circulated and distributed to a public audience, most of whom will be unknown to the letter writer and most of whom will never respond.

To accompany these short letters, you will take a mixtape approach, gradually compiling and assembling a selection of “clips”: images, sounds, words, and catch-phrases that capture your sense of this past year.

The primary aim of this writing course, however, will be to deepen your rhetorical awareness and sensitivity to audience and increase your stylistic and flexibility. Style is all about paying attention to the interactions between words, verbal patterns, and broader practices of meaning, including design, juxtaposition, and assemblage. You’ll learn to pay more attention to details that normally escape your notice. Over the course, you will gradually increase your stylistic repertoire of choices for communicating for different purposes with different people in different places. Weekly writing, collaborative reading responses, and a culminating remix-the-year project.

 

ENG 302 Technical Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101; junior standing. WP3. Major restrictions lift on February 26th, at 4:30pm.

20152 TR 10:00-11:50 am, attendance required at one session per week. Bell, Michael Patrick

English 302 is an introduction to the field of professional communication and document design. Communicators in this discipline are above all focused on readers and users. They are experts in rendering complex information in clear terms that their audiences can understand. They write the instructions and manuals that help us assemble and use various products at home and at work. They translate complex scientific and technological concepts for a lay audience, preparing guides, brochures, catalogs, press releases and newsletters. They administer professional websites and social media presence for businesses. They write and design teaching materials, including handouts and textbooks. They may also write copy for advertisements and deliver oral presentations at trade shows. More and more, “writing” in this field also includes a solid grasp of basic design principles and practices, and may include audio, video, and animation. You will emerge from the course with a grasp of the field, and a set of strategies and practices to carry forward into your professional writing tasks.

This spring, given how many of us are still working from home, the core of the course will involve a large-scale collaborative writing project using a combination of online tools. You will therefore not only get practice in rendering professional documents on your own, but also the methods through which they are often prepared collaboratively in the working world. This project could be an online how-to manual, an online store, an instructional video, a game, a lifestyle guide, an app…there are many possibilities.

Now that I’ve had some experience using a variety of approaches to remote learning, I’ve come to the conclusion that a blended modality works best for this course: The course is offered as a blended online course with one required synchronous meeting each week. Two meetings each week will be offered to correspond with class times.

20367 ASYNC, check-ins with instructor. Lewis, Justin A.

In ENG 302, we will be learning about and practicing technical communication through the study of rhetorical principles, audience analysis and user experience design (UXD). We will be learning about rhetorical problem-solving principles and applying them to diverse professional writing tasks and situations. In other words, in this class, you will be learning about the conventions for writing, speaking and designing appropriate workplace documents and communications.

20446 ASYNC, check-ins with instructor. Lewis, Justin A.

In ENG 302, we will be learning about and practicing technical communication through the study of rhetorical principles, audience analysis and user experience design (UXD). We will be learning about rhetorical problem-solving principles and applying them to diverse professional writing tasks and situations. In other words, in this class, you will be learning about the conventions for writing, speaking and designing appropriate workplace documents and communications.

20473 TR 12:00-01:50 pm Forsberg, Geri

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level workshop course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of nonacademic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, a formal report, an infographic, and a visual presentation. Students also learn to work in small breakout groups, collaborate on writing, and give peer feedback. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work. When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

20506 TR 02:00-03:50 pm Forsberg, Geri

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level workshop course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of nonacademic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, a formal report, an infographic, and a visual presentation. Students also learn to work in small breakout groups, collaborate on writing, and give peer feedback. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work. When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

20618 TR 02:00-03:50 pm, attendance required at one session per week. Bell, Michael Patrick

English 302 is an introduction to the field of professional communication and document design. Communicators in this discipline are above all focused on readers and users. They are experts in rendering complex information in clear terms that their audiences can understand. They write the instructions and manuals that help us assemble and use various products at home and at work. They translate complex scientific and technological concepts for a lay audience, preparing guides, brochures, catalogs, press releases and newsletters. They administer professional websites and social media presence for businesses. They write and design teaching materials, including handouts and textbooks. They may also write copy for advertisements and deliver oral presentations at trade shows. More and more, “writing” in this field also includes a solid grasp of basic design principles and practices, and may include audio, video, and animation. You will emerge from the course with a grasp of the field, and a set of strategies and practices to carry forward into your professional writing tasks.

This spring, given how many of us are still working from home, the core of the course will involve a large-scale collaborative writing project using a combination of online tools. You will therefore not only get practice in rendering professional documents on your own, but also the methods through which they are often prepared collaboratively in the working world. This project could be an online how-to manual, an online store, an instructional video, a game, a lifestyle guide, an app…there are many possibilities.

Now that I’ve had some experience using a variety of approaches to remote learning, I’ve come to the conclusion that a blended modality works best for this course: The course is offered as a blended online course with one required synchronous meeting each week. Two meetings each week will be offered to correspond with class times.

 

ENG 307 Seminar: Medieval 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 307 if you have taken ENG 307 or ENG 317.  Opens to creative writers (no teaching endorsement) on March 1st, at 10:30am. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

23615 MWF 02:30-03:50 pm Amendt-Raduege, Amy Michelle

Knights! Dragons! Churches! Really good gravy! The literature of the Middle Ages is diverse and fascinating, ranging from the silly to the sublime, the enlightening to the enigmatic, the humorous to the holy. Far from being stiff and boring, medieval literature is filled with adventure, excitement, and the ongoing quest to understand the human condition. The songs, stories, and tales of this period of history continue to exert their influence today, in works like The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, and even Game of Thrones - and it all begins with English 307.

Text: The Broadview Anthology of Medieval Literature.

 

ENG 309 Seminar: The Long 18th Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 309 if you have already taken ENG 319 or 309. Opens to creative writers (no teaching endorsement) on March 1st, at 10:30am. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

21610 TR 12:00-01:50 pm, class meets for around 90 minutes per session. Loar, Christopher F.

Sex and Love After Shakespeare and Before Austen: A lot changed in Great Britain between the 1660s and the 1790s, but perhaps nothing changed more than ideas about love, romance, and sexual desire. The literatures of the early part of this period—the Restoration—were famous for their free attitudes towards sexuality and their play with gender roles. By the end of the 1790s, a new “normal” sex and gender system had developed—one organized around marriage and heterosexuality—though oppositional voices persisted, making the case for more open attitudes towards sex and gender.

In this course we will examine some of the writing from this transitional period; we will also read recent critical work that challenges traditional thinking about sexuality and gender in this era.

 

ENG 310 Seminar: The Long 19th Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 310 if you have already taken ENG 320 or 310. Opens to creative writers (no teaching endorsement) on March 1st, at 10:30am. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

21611 MW 10:00-11:20 am, F optional. Giffen, Allison A.

19th C US Literature and the Racial Politics of Childhood: What is childhood and how has it been variously defined and understood? This is one of the central questions we will take up as we explore textual and visual representations of childhood in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. New ideals about childhood emerge in the nineteenth century that are shaped by Romantic notions of childhood innocence. Our work this quarter will focus particularly on the role that race played in these new conceptions of childhood. We will begin with the racialized construction of girlhood in the novels of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Harriet Wilson, then explore seduction and consent in the figure of the tragic mulatto, in the work of Lydia Maria Child and Harriet Jacobs. We will conclude by turning to the popular children’s periodical St Nicholas Magazine and investigate the cultural work it performed in its representations of Black and white boyhood.

 

ENG 311 Seminar: The 20-21st Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 311 if you have already taken ENG 321 or 311. Opens to creative writers (no teaching endorsement) on March 1st, at 10:30am. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

21612 TR 02:00-03:30 pm Heim, Stefania F.

MODERN ELEGY

“Swift as startled fawn or swallow,
Silence all her sound,
She has fled; we cannot follow
Further than this mound.
We who take the beaten track,
Trying to appease
Hearts near breaking with their lack,
We need elegies.”
-- Countee Cullen, “Threnody for a Brown Girl” (1925)

What can literature possibly offer us in the experience of grieving our beloved dead? How might stanzas or musical language negotiate the intersection of private and public trauma, relating individuals to the world in moments of the most intense feeling? What kind of poetry can speak to structural violence and mass killings in racist, sexist, and xenophobic states? What relationships can we imagine between mourning, literature, and politics? Derived from the Greek for “mournful song,” the traditional “European elegy” is understood to move through three stages of loss: from lament, to praise, to consolation. In this class we will consider the legacies of this form, its developments across the 20th century, and any potential it might have for our present. We will study elegies that confront intimate loss as well the most devastating aspects of the past century: lynchings, the Holocaust, perpetual war and industrialized armed conflict, the police murders of Black people, the AIDS epidemic, and the COVID-19 pandemic. We will root our investigations in various theoretical approaches, close reading poems that, in Jahan Ramazani’s words, “erupt with all the violence and irresolution, all the guilt and ambivalence of modern mourning ” In this small, student-centered, writing-intensive seminar, interactive discussions and various scaffolded creative and critical writing assignments will provide multiple ways in to this challenging and moving material.

 

ENG 313 Critical Theories & Prac I 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20076 MWF 11:30-12:50 pm Prichard, Tony Alan

An examination of the history of Critical Theory and Practices from the pre-Socrates to Kant.

20363 TR 12:00-01:50 pm Yu, Ning

This course surveys a variety of literary and cultural theories, with a brief review of the ancient thinkers such as Plato and Aristotle, and then reviews with some depth five schools of our contemporary thinking: formalism, reader-response, psycho-analysis, structuralism/deconstruction and feminism. We will cope with our “theoretical anxiety” with the help of practical criticism, focusing on one creative work, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, working out outlines for papers approaching the same novella from different theoretical perspectives listed above.

We will write two short essays, one at mid-term (5 pages) and the other as the final paper (7 pages). The first one (20%) requires you to use the formalist approach to Heart of Darkness, while the second one would ask you compare and/or contrast what two different literary approaches can do to the same novella (25%). Rather than mid-term and final examinations, each student will write a summary for each of the essays we read when s/he is not writing questions for that day’s discussion (20%; you’re required to post your summaries the night before the class meeting during which the essays you summarize will be discussed. Your summaries will be regularly and strictly checked, but not graded. By the end of the quarter, you will have 20 summaries or outlines, with 1% for each summary). They are the things you can walk out of the classroom with at the end of the quarter, and they are yours to use for the rest of your college career and beyond. Each student is also responsible for five thought-provoking questions and be prepared to lead discussions with the questions (15%, 3% for each question).  When it is your turn to lead class discussion, you will post your question on Canvas the night before (by 7:00 pm). The rest of the class will read it and think about it before they come to class. Thus prepared, we can best use our class “contact hours” working on difficult issues under discussion.  Your general participation will be 20% of your total grade.

 

ENG 314 Critical Theories & Prac II 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

23621 W 11:30-12:50 pm, MF asynchronous. Hardman, Pam

CONTENT: Whenever you read or watch anything, talk to others, use technology, listen to music, play a game, and even dream, you are engaged in complex webs of meaning. In this course we will “read” these webs closely and critically, exploring how power and identity influence the meanings we produce and the meanings imposed on us. The goals of the course are to increase your abilities to critically interpret various texts and cultural phenomena, and to write about these interpretations, interweaving your own ideas with other theorists’ notions.

We’ll use the assigned readings as starting points for analyzing a variety of cultural products, such as literary texts, film, television, advertisements, technology, social institutions, and music. The course will focus on theories articulated from the 19th century to the present.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assigned reading; participation in class discussions; one contextual meaning exercise; two explication/application papers; final exam.

POSSIBLE TEXTS: Dale Parker, Critical Theory; Jeffrey Nealon and Susan Searls Giroux, The Theory Toolbox

23622 TR 10:00-11:00 am Rivera, Lysa

As English majors, much of what you do involves reading texts against the grain, looking beneath the surface and under the hood, so to speak, to understand and appreciate the many ways a text makes meaning and the many ways it relates to, reflects, and even shapes the structures and systems of the world beyond its pages. This class will help you along the way, offering as it does an introduction to major modes and schools of literary criticism – including psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, Marxism, and post-colonialism. Think of this course as you might a toolbox for literary studies: while it in no way presumes to give you a complete overview of literary theory, it equips you with some helpful blueprints and a general foundation upon which you can build your ability to write critically, effectively, and interestingly about literary texts and the communities they inhabit.

Required texts include The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (third edition only) and Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights (Norton Critical Edition only).

 

ENG 317 Survey: Medieval 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 317 if you have already taken ENG 307 or 317. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

23829 TR 02:00-03:30 pm Vulic, Kathryn Rajam

Course Description and Objectives: Get ready for a wild ride – medieval literature is not what you think it might be, given the ways that medieval texts and history are represented in popular culture! There’s a lot more subtlety, sophistication, humor, and literary variety than the Middle Ages get credit for. This course covers the first era in the Literature and Culture sequence, from the earliest surviving writings in English to the advent of the printing press in England. We will sample a broad array of genres, techniques, forms, and themes of the literature of medieval England, many of which establish models and expectations for the writings of later eras. We will also trace the effects of an increasingly literate population and increasingly sophisticated writing technology (like the introduction of paper and the printing press to England) on literary culture.

This class aims at breadth of coverage (with course readings consisting of excerpts as well as whole texts), rather than depth, though this course could be designed productively either way. This class focuses on what it meant to read and write in Middle English, and therefore strives not only for a general understanding of the politics and other social factors that influence writing in English, but also examines the range of writing interests expressed by those who chose to compose in English.

Textbook: Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1: The Medieval Period (3rd ed., 2014) and supplements posted to Canvas.

Tentative assignments:

  • Daily readings and participation (in class, on Canvas, or a mix)
  • Two of the following:
    • Mythbusters research project: what preconception or myth about the medieval past would you like to explore? Test whether modern beliefs about the past are grounded in historical fact.
    • Medievalisms research project: pick a modern work of art (a book, TV show, film, video game, etc.) or other cultural phenomenon that appears to draw on medieval source material. How does the borrowed medieval material serve a modern purpose?
    • Poetry project: write a poem in the style of one of the poems on the course syllabus, as well as a one-page introduction to your work that explains your approach and decisions.
    • Open up the syllabus: what one other text do you wish had been added to the syllabus? Propose one day’s worth of readings and a rationale for what it would bring to the class discussion, including a sample lesson plan and writing assignment.
  • Unit review and reflection (three total spread through the quarter, similar to take-home midterms)

 

ENG 319 Survey: The Long 18th Century 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 319 if you have already taken ENG 309 or 319. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

21613 MWF 08:30-09:50 am Laffrado, Laura

CONTENT: This courses focuses on the time period that scholars have recently named the long eighteenth century—that is, the era that extends from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century. These are such dynamic years in the literature of what becomes the United States. We will read literary works by women and by men of various races, ethnicities, religions, and economic positions that explore vital issues of the day such as liberty, literacy, revolution, and science. We will examine the various ways in which a dominant rich male whiteness is challenged as America and American identities are formed and defined.

ASSIGNMENTS: Much reading, writing, and thinking will be asked of you, along with two exams, a participation grade, group work, and regular attendance.

TEXTS: Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume A, 7th edition.

 

ENG 321 Survey: The 20-21st Centuries 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 321 if you have already taken ENG 311 or 321. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

21614 TR 02:00-04:00 pm Lester, Mark


In this course, reaction and resistance will be examined as responses to nihilism and drivers of the stylistic innovation and experimentation with new technical modalities that characterize much twentieth century art and literature.

Topics will include:

  • Technological Optimism (Futurism and its Eastern and Central European offshoots: Constructivism, Suprematism, Rayonism….)
  • Technological pessimism (Dada — détournement avant la lettre)
  • Enervation, Fragmentation, and the Reemergence of an Aestheticist Credo
  • The Bomb
  • Perpetual Resistance, Improvisation, Luck

The course is intended as a broad overview and jumping-off point for further research. Texts will include both manifestos and critical works as well as poems and novels. The course will be synchronous, and online class sessions will be discussion-oriented. Assessment will be based on short reading responses, active participation in class, and one or two short papers.

TEXTS: T. Benson and E Forgás, Between Worlds: A Sourcebook of Central European Avant-Gardes, 1910-1930 (ISBN: 978-0262025300); Mina Loy, The Lost Lunar Baedeker—Poems (ISBN: 978-0374525071); S.I. Witkiewicz,The Madman and the Nun and the Crazy Locomotive (ISBN: 978-0936839837); Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited (ISBN: 978-0316216456); Peter Weiss, Aesthetics of Resistance, Volume 1 (ISBN: 978-0822335467): Stewart Home: 69 Things to do with a Dead Princess (ISBN: 978-1841953533). Other material will be posted onCanvas; links to online sources will be supplied.

Note: Some of the material in this course has explicit sexual content that more sensitive readers may find offensive.

 

ENG 331 Studies in Gender Theory 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 or WGSS 211. This course is cross-listed with WGSS 331 (CRN 23886). All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

23626 F 01:00-02:00 pm optional meetings. Warburton, Theresa Anne

This course approaches the topic of gender from multiple perspectives by exploring how it intersects with other systemic and institutional structures endemic to American society, culture, and history, including settlement, medicalization, racialization, and archives. By engaging a combination of cultural objects and theoretical texts, we will explore multiple and some contradictory theories about gender, how gender operates as a theory itself, and how its shifting contours inform and are informed by the political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of our world(s). This course will encourage students to develop the skills necessary to recognize, describe, and evaluate theoretical arguments about gender, will give them an understanding of some of the important conversations surrounding gender in the 20th and 21st centuries, and will teach them to apply these theories as methodological tool in the study of literature.

At the end of this course, students can expect to: have familiarity with contemporary gender theory; explicate and evaluate theoretical arguments about gender; use theoretical arguments about gender to analyze cultural objects, including visual art, music, film, and literature; and communicate effectively in both written and verbal forms about gender theory as a body of both scholarly and popular inquiry. Students will be evaluated on both their written work and active participation in class.

 

ENG 334 TextsAcrossNAm&Eur: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent. BCGM.

22113 ASYNC, optional discussion meetings R 12:00-01:00 pm. Sheahan, Annmarie

“Latinx literature for youth, like perhaps no other Latinx-led space at the moment, publicly amplifies voices of people who have been left out of both U.S. and Latinx canons.”-Marilisa Jiménez Garcia

This course will center Latinx and Chicanx literature for youth as a platform for artistic expression, collective memory, community advocacy, and adolescent agency. Together, we will consider how Latinx and Chicanx youth negotiate notions of “outsiderness” on their own terms through exploring an array of adolescent and young adult literature across various genres and mediums. Grounding our reading, analysis, and discussion of course texts in Testimonio scholarship, critical studies in multicultural young adult literature, critical literacy, and LatCrit, we will work to reinterpret and interrogate perceptions of Latinx and Chicanx youth across historical, cultural, and pop cultural contexts. Acknowledging the framework of the bildungsroman, we will also explore how Latinx and Chicanx authors challenge and transform the traditional expectations of the genre. Most importantly, we will celebrate the power of Latinx and Chicanx youth to create and recreate their own understandings of self as they simultaneously transform the communities around them.

Course Format: Asynchronous; Optional discussion meetings on Thursdays 12-1

Course Texts:

  • Bless Me, Ultima (Rudolfo Anaya)
  • Gabi, A Girl In Pieces (Isabel Quintero)
  • Darkroom: A Memoir In Black and White (Lila Quintero Weaver)
  • Running (Natalia Sylvester)
  • With the Fire on High (Elizabeth Acevedo)
  • In the Heights (Music and Lyrics by Lin Manual Miranda; Book by Quiara Alegría Hudes)
  • Shadowshaper (Daniel José Older) OR We Set the Dark on Fire (Tehlor Kay Mejia) OR Cemetery Boys (Aiden Thomas)

 

ENG 338 Women's Lit N Am and Europe 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. BCGM.

20458 MWF 11:30-12:50 pm, shorted synchronous meetings. Dugger, Julie

Women Writers and Readers: What is a women’s text? We will attempt to answer this question by looking at two groups: women who create literature, and women who read it. Part One of the course will examine how beliefs about gender define the female writer and her relationship to (or opposition to) the Western cultural tradition. Texts we will read include critical and/or autobiographical works by Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Leslie Marmon Silko, bell hooks, Toni Morrison, and Eavan Boland. Part Two will consider the other side of the question and look at a literary genre defined by a primarily female readership, opening an investigation into romance novels and how their gendering affects their conventions and perceived literary value.

 

ENG 342 Studies in Literary Genres 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

22927 T 02:00-03:50 pm, R asynchronous. Beasley, Bruce H.

Studies in Literary Genres: The Monstrous Body: We will explore the monstrous as both subject and literary mode in novels, stories, films, and a and read in critical theories of the monstrous Other in culture and writing. In what ways can monstrous excess become a literary form as well as a subject used to interrogate cultural assumptions about what is "normal" and what is monstrously "Other"?

 

ENG 347 Studies in Young Adult Lit 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 or instructor permission. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20434 T 02:00-03:00 pm, R optional discussion meetings. Sheahan, Annmarie

With a focus on identity, community, and agency, this course will familiarize you with multiple genres and mediums of literature written for young adults (ages 12-20+) and will provide a survey of texts geared toward adolescent readers. Our work will explore texts by both well-known and lesser-known YA authors as we consider the relevance of young adult literature for both adolescent and adult readers. Together, we will read books by diverse writers and respond to these writers in diverse ways, privileging adolescent voice in understanding the development of identity and agency across varied communities and experiences. Throughout the course we will consider whose voices get heard in YA literature and how those voices offer insight into teen lives and experiences. We will also explore YA literature as a vehicle for critical literacy, equity, and inclusion, thinking about some of the social, political, and ideological issues that surround the field. As such, course texts, assignments, and discussions will be framed by critical perspectives acknowledging the importance of adolescent voice in unpacking systems of oppression and in imagining and creating more hopeful, equitable futures for young people.

In lieu of a traditional final, your culminating project for this course will take the form of a multi-genre, multi-modal creative project centered on a particular character’s path toward identity development, agency, and change.

COURSE FORMAT:

This course will be taught in a blended format, meaning we will have mandatory synchronous meetings on Tuesday from 2:00-3:00 and optional discussion meetings on Thursday from 2:00-3:00. All other work will be asynchronous.

Required Whole Class Texts:

  • The Poet X (Elizabeth Acevedo)
  • Mary’s Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein (Lita Judge)
  • They Called Us Enemy (George Takei)
  • The Fountains of Silence (Ruta Sepetys)

 

Required Choice of:

  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (Benjamin Alire Sáenz) OR Felix Ever After (Kacen Callender) ORThe Stars and the Blackness Between Them (Junauda Petrus)
  • Punching the Air (Ibi Zoboi & Yusef Salaam) ORThe Hate U Give (Angie Thomas) OR Dig (A.S. King)
  • Individually selected text for our final unit on YA speculative fiction/fantasy/sci-fi

 

Not Required:

*Excerpts from#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women(Lisa Charleyboy and MaryBeth Leatherdale.

 

ENG 350 Intro to Creative Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101.  All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20153 MW 09:00-10:00 am, F asynchronous. Miller, Brenda

This back-to-basics creative writing course will cover the essentials of craft across genres, such as image, metaphor, narrative, scene-building, etc. We will also explore how to enhance your writing practice and overcome common obstacles to creativity in a busy world. You will be doing intensive writing and reading to build your range of skills in preparation for advanced courses in creative writing genres.

Text: The Practice of Creative Writing, Fourth Edition, by Heather Sellers. This book is available as a print or e-book edition, and can be bought or rented through the AS Bookstore, the Macmillan Learning Website, and Amazon. One copy of the book is available to borrow from the Western Library.

I strongly recommend owning the print edition for ease of use, but these other formats are available at various price points. You will need the textbook starting with the first day of class, so order early!

20513 ASYNC, occasional small group meetings. McGuire, Simon Leonard

In this course we will explore, discuss, practice and revise forms of poetry, short fiction and creative non-fiction. I'll introduce you to exercises in ekphrasis (writing about art), traditional forms, poetry machines and current trends in contemporary poetics (visual poetry, collaborative writing methods, conceptual writing, multilingual pieces.). While we all will work remotely, everyone will be required to participate each week in small group discussion forums to read and responds to assignments and complete attentive peer reviews. This course uses Imaginative Writing (4th ed.) as a main text, and I will offer other documents and sources on Canvas.

23627 ASYNC Pagh, Nancy

Students in this asynchronous section of Introduction to Creative Writing will work through weekly modules to examine and practice the fundamentals of craft: imagery and figurative language; sound; character and setting; voice and perspective; form and structure. We will focus on “close reading” of model poetry and prose; brainstorm creative expression and response; draft poems, stories, and creative nonfiction personal essays; share some of these projects with peers; and revise selected works--learning how to communicate about and make practical use of feedback on drafts in at least two genres. We will use recorded video applications to record and share writing and peer feedback with one another. Evaluation will be based on completion of a sequence of activities in each course module/week.

Required Textbook:

  • Write Moves: A Creative Writing Guide & Anthology

23628 T 04:00-05:50 pm, R asynchronous. Weed, Katie

“When I'm writing, I'm thinking about time, pace, rhythm, cadence. Sometimes the language is upright, more formal in sound--my getting out of the story's way. Other times, the words lay down, lean, fall on each other, play differently, which makes a different sound and music. That's the part of craft that I love most. Thinking about how to stack the language.” -- Sarah M. Broom

“Remember, we are mortal, but poetry is not.” -- Patti Smith

“My mantra was: follow the fun. If I’m not having fun, I’m doing it wrong.” -- Jordan Peele

In this introduction to the practices, promises, and pleasures of creative writing, we’ll explore multiple genres: creative nonfiction, poetry, and screenwriting. Together, we will immerse ourselves in a variety of works from these genres, engaging with authors and artists across continents and centuries. We’ll pay careful attention to theory and various approaches to craft, focusing on both tradition and innovation.

In this community of practice--and in these extraordinary times--we’ll be drafting extensively both in and out of class, creating a range of work to share, offering and receiving substantial peer feedback. You will compose pieces inspired by and in response to those we read, and as well generate original work of your own design, culminating in a polished portfolio and virtual reading.

 

ENG 351 Intro to Fiction Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 350. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20341 MW 02:30-03:30 pm, F asynchronous. Westhoff, Kami Dawn Marie

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

20514 TR 02:00-03:50 pm, participation encouraged however asynchronous option available. Araki-Kawaguchi, Hiroki

As a participant in this course, we will ask you to develop fictional worlds, characters and predicaments. We will have conversations about the fundamental elements of fiction (e.g. tense, pov, dialog, voice, conflict), as we examine both a diverse body of published work and the early drafts by your peers.

Expect this to be an exciting and challenging course. We hope you will develop new ways of thinking, working, writing and communicating. We hope you will take risks. You do not have to write magnificent fiction to do well in this course. You will have to be brave, respectful and a hard worker.

Participation in a 5-credit course is equivalent to 150 hours of work over the quarter. This will include 4 hours of classroom time weekly (lecture, discussions, workshop) and approximately 10 hours of outside preparation (reading, writing, investigating, reflecting, projects). You are also encouraged to visit me in office hours, attend (online) literary events, and connect (online) with your peers.

Required reading to include Wonderbook by Jeff VanderMeer, Making Comics by Lynda Barry, If the Body Allows It by Megan Cummins, and course handouts. I am also asking that you find access to a portable electronic device that will allow you to listen to a podcast and move simultaneously (e.g. walk or dance).

 

ENG 353 Introduction to Poetry Writing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 350. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20077 TR 10:00-11:50 am Beasley, Bruce H.

This course will be an intensive introduction to poetry and all aspects of poetry writing, including metaphor; rhythm; imagery; sonic devices such as assonance, consonance, alliteration, and rhyme; formal structures (villanelle, sestina, pantoum, sonnet, couplets, quatrains); and revision. We will read a few poems intensively each class and do a variety of in-class writings and exercises in response to the model poems. Students will develop three portfolios of finished poems derived from exercises and in-class writings, a portfolio of revisions, and will perform a poem of their choice.

 

22464 TR 02:00-03:50 pm, most meetings optional. Shipley, Ely

This course focuses on the practice of reading and writing poetry. While the primary concern is student writing, we work from the basis that in order to become better writers, we also must become better readers. We will explore a range of poetic traditions and contemporary developments and spend the quarter reading, writing, and discussing poetry through focusing on elements such as metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, line, and dramatic tension. You will be responsible for not only submitting original work, but also for offering thoughtful observations to each work discussed. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

 

ENG 354 Intro to Creative Nonfict Writ 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 350. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20364 WF 10:00-11:20 am, occasional M meetings. Yeasting, Jeanne Ellen

CONTENT: This course will focus on creating and revising original creative nonfiction. Students will be introduced to a variety of forms of nonfiction, including memoir and lyric essays. Students will read and study the craft of range of nonfiction writers, and use their texts as catalysts for generating and revising their own work. We’ll study the work of some earlier practitioners, as well as contemporary authors.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assignments include considerable reading of writing model creative nonfiction; weekly writing and revising of creative nonfiction; giving detailed peer feedback using guidelines; posting to a weekly reading response forum; and completing a Final project. Students may be required to work on a collaborative project and/or conduct research.

EVALUATION: Based primarily on active, attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments, including a Final Project.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Lex Williford and Michael Martone, editors. Touchstone Anthology of Creative Nonfiction. Touchstone (2007).
    paperback: ISBN 978-1416531746
    digital: Kindle, Apple Books
  • Zadie Zmith. Intimations: Six Essays. Penguin Random House (2020).
    paperback: ISBN 978-0593297612
    digital: Apple Books, and through Penguin: ISBN 978-0593297629
  • Judith Kitchen and Dinah Lenny, editors. Brief Encounters: A Collection of Contemporary Nonfiction. W.W. Norton (2016).
    paperback: ISBN: 978-0393350999
    digital: Kindle, Apple Books
  • Selected readings on Canvas

20614 TR 08:00-09:50 am Guess, Carol

This introductory Creative Nonfiction writing workshop focuses on the themes of lying and truth-telling. Students will write two short essays and one longer essay, exploring truth through the cloudy windows of memory and observation.

Assignments/Evaluation:

  • Two short essays
  • One longer essay

 

ENG 364 Introduction to Film Studies 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101

20515 R 10:00-11:50 am, T asynchronous. Odabasi, Eren

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the key components of film expression such as cinematography, sound, editing, and production design. We will closely analyze several canonical films from around the world, utilizing the fundamental concepts and definitions covered in the course units. Furthermore, we will explore cinema’s relationship to other arts and various media forms.

More specific course objectives:

  • Enrich your ability to look and listen closely to motion pictures
  • Understand and apply a range of critical and cultural theories to the study of cinema
  • Explore a range of film genres, national cinemas, historical periods, and auteurs, with an emphasis on expanding the frame from Hollywood to a more diverse world cinema
  • Engage with local film cultures and other communities rooted in cinephilia

 

ENG 365 Film Hist: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 364 or ENG 202

21618 W 01:00-02:20 pm, MF asynchronous. Youmans, Greg

The course surveys the history of experimental film, video, and digital media. Together we will explore various artistic movements (e.g., surrealism, structural film), medium-specific practices (Super 8, analog video), formal techniques (scratching on celluloid, found footage), and genres (the trance film, machinima). We will move more or less chronologically, but as we go along we will connect our historical investigations forward to contemporary practices, particularly as they relate to digital technologies. In the class, you will be asked to write critically about experimental media and to create an experimental media work of your own.

 

ENG 371 Rhetorical Practices 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101 and junior status. Major restrictions lift on February 26th, at 4:30pm.

23631 T 02:00-03:15 pm, R asynchronous. Cushman, Jeremy W.

Rhetorical practices, even (maybe especially) when they are not performed intentionally, underlie inherent systems like capitalism, huge and faceless institutions, powerful activists communities, grocery and electronic stores, ideas of self-understanding, and so on. The thing is, persuasion happens. It has to! We come to understand ourselves one way rather than another; our world gets categorized so we believe we should not to shop for yams at BestBuy; our heart rate quickens and our faces flush when we speak out with others against an idea or action that our community believes is wrong or evil; big institutions like universities convince us to identify as a freshman or a senior; nearly invisible systems of exchange like capitalism teach us to value only what we can count. This is all to say, persuasion is baked into our living in a world with others. There is no "not being persuaded."

Together, we're going to deal with the fact that persuasion happens--that is has to happen. We're going practice and explore some of the most powerful rhetorical ideas, competencies, and activities that permeate 21st-century knowledge work and advocacy. To do so, we'll engage with and challenge rhetoric's *longstanding* origin story, which says that rhetoric started in Greece around the 4th century BCE and has framed much of our Western tradition. Challenging that origin story will allow us to better articulate the super strange and complex ways persuasion emerges and functions in our contemporary lives, often beyond our own intentions.

To be clear, we are not going to go in a linear fashion where we start with the Greeks and slowly move through rhetoric's supposed story. (That kind of linear systems is also a persuasive system that convinces us knowledge moves in one direction). No, together, we'll stir up several historical and newer approaches to rhetoric so that you can invent and practice in ways that are personal and meaningful. For example, we'll compare:

  • ancient understandings of rhetoric
  • contemporary rhetorical practices connected to the Sociology of Science
  • the ways rhetoric turned into a 'bad word'
  • the possibilities of a proto-rhetoric in the Paleolithic era (60,000 years ago!)
  • the ways race, gender, and the related notion of individualism get tethered to rhetorical practices
  • rhetoric's role in imagination and advocacy


Such a wide engagement, I hope, will help you better approach the ways persuasion and advocacy emerge as productive possibilities. I also hope the class pushes you to invent powerful and personal responses to that rather tired question about what a degree, or even a single class, in the Humanities is good for.

What You Need:

  1. Daily attention to our Canvas site
  2. A dedicated notebook

 

ENG 385 Sustainability Literacy II 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENVS 116 or ENG 201 or ENG 202. WP3.

21867 R 02:00-03:50 pm, T asynchronous. Brown, Nicole

Systems Thinking in the context of the Humanities offers you a perspective for understanding how discourse and the social construction of "knowledge" is shaped by interdependent elements forming a complex and unified whole. By shifting the focus from parts to whole, this writing course articulates big picture ideas and synthesizes information from different perspectives and disciplines to address and solve current problems. Course inquiry shifts the focus from analytical thinking to contextual thinking and develops an ecological practice towards the relationship between change in social, biological, economic, and technological systems through the unifying field of language and the constant of change.

Systems thinking as a methodology can be applied to every context—from professional organizations to permaculture, from family to political relations, from indigenous knowledge to western science. This class introduces you to the methodology of systems thinking and the specialized language and tools that encourage us to grasp the ways in which language and discourse—writing ecologies—construct, sustain, and change systems (and power within systems) over time.

The course will involve guest presentations from social change leaders in the PNW. This broad spectrum of disciplinary viewpoints and worldviews will offer a unique interdisciplinary perspective on systems thinking and the properties of a viable, desirable, and sustainable futures. Course projects include weekly writing assignments incorporating visual and verbal elements, including experimenting with new media and/or performance-based compositions. For the major project you will be a part of a team that applies a systems thinking approach to an organization or other community exigence you care about here that carries particular relevance to the Salish Sea bioregion. We will use these models to develop and implement social and/or policy solutions through written and oral proposals.

You should leave the course with excellent writing samples: mappings, systems and rhetorical analyses, research displays, and proposals, as well as a new vocabulary and methodology to facilitate systems-based analysis, communication, and change.

 

ENG 397K Cultural Disability Studies 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 101. HUM.

23638 ASYNC Lucchesi, Andrew John

This brand new, experimental course is all about the concept of disability. It’s a complicated idea, really. On the one hand, around one in four adults in the U.S. has a disability, and almost all of us will acquire disabilities (or acquire more disabilities) as we grow older. This definition of disability matters a lot to doctors, social workers, politicians, and activists. Our class will focus on the cultural phenomenon of disability, the ways the concept appears in fairy tales, visual art, and even in the English language itself. Rather than thinking about the medical side of disability, we will focus on texts written by disabled people, including cultural histories, memoir, comic books, documentary films, and activist manifestos. By the end of our class, you'll recognize the central role disability plays in many cultures, and you'll have new critically aware ways to write and think about this important concept.

This asynchronous GUR course will involve quite a bit of writing, including reading responses, short blog-style essays, and a final project. You will frequently work on projects with small groups, either in writing or via Zoom, whatever works best for your group. And I will meet with you individually in conferences once or twice during the quarter to work on your writing. Finally, all of our course readings will be available as free ebooks through the Western library, including Keywords for Disability Studies (2015) and Disability / Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century (2020), plus several academic articles from the interdisciplinary field of disability studies.

If you are considering this class but you’re not sure if it’s right for you, email me at andrew.lucchesi@wwu.edu.

 

ENG 401 Sr Writing Studies/Rhet Sem 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301 or ENG 302 or ENG 370 or ENG 371, or instructor permission; senior status. Major restrictions lift on February 26th, at 4:30pm.

23866 MW 11:30-12:50 pm, F asynchronous. Qualley, Donna Jeanne

Something is going on.

The transition from a literacy culture to an electronic culture is engendering change—but not just to our technologies. It is changing our institutions, communities, values, behaviors, and practices. It is altering the ways we design and exchange ideas and information. It is creating new notions of subjectivity, identity, and representation. Some people think that we are on the cusp of a transformation that could be as significant as the change from orality to literacy several thousand years ago. So, what’s next after literacy? The name that some rhetoric scholars have given this next “something” is electracy, and it is still in the process of being invented. In this rhetoric seminar we’ll consider questions like these:

  • What is this something called electracy?
  • What new ways of knowing, being, making, and communicating are emerging in this “electrate” apparatus?
  • What new genres and practices are being invented in this landscape?
  • How can we contribute to the invention of this new apparatus? How are we already contributing?
  • What is the relationship between play, entertainment, and truth?
  • How are emotional responses circulated and re-purposed through digital networks?

All readings and on-line videos are available on Canvas. In addition to collaborative reading annotations and occasional discussion posts, you’ll have the opportunity to engage in some really “electrate” multi-layered, multi-modal projects This is going to be so fun!

 

ENG 406 Topics:Critical/Culturl Theory 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 313 or ENG 314; two courses from: ENG 307-347, ENG 364 or ENG 371. WP3. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

22466 W 10:00-11:20 am, MF asynchronous. Dietrich, Dawn Y.

Comic books, once depicted as “corrupters of youth, agents of illiteracy, signs of moral and intellectual degeneration, and evidence for the decline of ‘Western civilization,’” are now at the forefront of literary studies as an innovative and vanguard medium. This course will study the evolution of English language comics from early turn-of-the-century newspaper comic strips, comic books, and pulp entertainment to sequential art forms and graphic novels in the twenty-first century. In particular, we will focus on the emergence of the graphic novel during the 1980s, which extended a tradition of abbreviated comic forms to include longer, more cohesive word/image art recognized for its narrative coherence, formal complexity, and alternative sensibility. We will approach the study of graphic novels as a sequential art form and investigate its relation to both print and electronic media, including transmedia storytelling. We’ll consider the role comics have played in censorship campaigns and other forms of social regulation, including the Congressional debates, which concerned juvenile delinquency in the 1950s, and the Comics Code Authority, which still governs the content of mainstream comics today. Equally important, we’ll look at comics’ relationship to history and politics in a post WWII context, exploring a diverse range of cultural perspectives.

Assignments

Students will have the opportunity to write multi-modal blogs that feature a close analysis of the text in and through a medium-specific lens.

Required Texts

  • Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud
  • The System of Comics, Thierry Groensteen
  • Incognegro, Mat Johnson
  • Maus I and II, Art Spiegelman
  • Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, Alison Bechdel
  • Watchmen, Alan Moore

Required Viewing

  • Watchmen: Tales of the Black Freighter, Daniel DelPurgatorio and Mike Smith
  • Watchmen: Under the Hood, Eric Matthies
  • Watchmen: The Stop-Motion Comic, Jake Hughes
  • Watchmen (film, directed by Zack Snyder)
  • Watchmen (HBO series, Damon Lindelof et al.)

Optional

  • The Mindscape of Alan Moore, DeZ Vylenz
  • Before Watchmen prequel series, featuring diverse artists

 

ENG 410 Lit Hist: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371. WP3. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20919 TR 12:00-01:50 pm Lee, Jean

Literature and Art of Black Radical Thought

This class will explore the intimate relationship between the politics of Black radicalism with the literature of the Black Arts Movement. We will read autobiographies, speeches, and political analyses that demonstrate the dialogues among Black internationalism and nationalism, Black Power, and civil rights. These texts will inform our engagement with “the artistic sister of the Black Power Movement” as we focus on the ways African American artists intervened in representations of Blackness and produced an aesthetic that enacted their commitment to self-determination, Black liberation, and social revolution.

 

ENG 418 Sr Sem: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: Senior status; ENG 313 or ENG 314; and one course from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310 or ENG 311. Important note: ENG 418 is not repeatable & cannot be used as an elective for the literature major. Opens to Juniors on March 1st, at 10:30am. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20459 F 08:30-09:50 am, MW asynchronous. Anderson, Katherine J.

Westworlds: Imperial Adventure Fiction:

From the Indiana Jones and Lara Croft film franchises to updated Westerns such as Netflix’s Godless and HBO’s Westworld, American culture is obsessed with romanticized stories of imperialist adventure. What are the origins of these familiar tales? What part does adventure fiction play in molding (or interrogating) the Anglophone psyche?

This class examines and contextualizes a genre of British fiction that first rose to popularity during the burst of imperial fervor accompanying European rivalry over parts of Africa, Asia, and Oceania in the 1880s and 1890s: the adventure romance. We’ll attend to histories of empire, imperialism, capitalism, and globalization in direct relation to this literary history and genealogy, and, conversely, to the importance of imperialism and globalization in literary history. Alongside our nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Anglophone novels, we will examine some contemporary visual texts that speak back to, reinterpret, double-down on, or enter into conversation with the representations of Western imperialism and colonialism in the original adventure fictions, creating new meanings as they do so. We’ll also read critical sources that will provide us with a variety of theoretical frameworks to help us expand our discussion of imperialism in the nineteenth century and beyond. Some of the questions we will consider include: How did social positioning, for example class, race, or gender identity, affect experiences of empire in the nineteenth century? How does the nineteenth-century British Empire inform our current experiences of American (neo)imperialism? What is the relationship of narrative to empire and expansion? How does form or genre affect a depiction of empire? What are the fears and desires embodied in nineteenth-century adventure fictions, and how does the genre transform in response to changing cultural demands and concerns? Ultimately, what can these nineteenth-century fantasies, and their twenty- and twenty-first century offspring, teach us about ourselves?

Course Objectives:

This course provides deep analysis of the rise of a nineteenth-century literary genre, loosely identified as adventure fiction, as well as the cultural preoccupations with which adventure fiction grapples, and the ways in which those preoccupations – and the genre of adventure fiction itself – remain deeply embedded in Anglophone identity and culture today. You will exit this course with a sophisticated understanding of an influential genre of literature that is much more than entertainment; of the global history of empire, particularly as it played out at the end of the nineteenth century; and of theorizations of both of these things and some important related concepts, such as Anglophone exceptionalism, various forms of capitalism, and settler colonialism.

Student Learning Objectives (what you’ll get from your work in this class):

  • Advanced ability to analyze nineteenth-century literature and to relate its concerns and modes of expression to its historical context, as well as to the contemporary moment and its literature.
  • Advanced capacity to compare and contrast texts within a genre (specifically, the Anglophone genre of adventure fiction), making connections while noting evolutions in form, style, and content across its literary genealogy.
  • Increased understanding of the global history of imperialism and its ramifications
  • Advanced ability to perform and then apply proactive research.
  • Advanced ability to write cogent literary criticism.
  • Increased autonomy in assessing literary texts and critical theories.
  • Increased ability to participate in an ongoing academic conversation.
  • Increased self-awareness of personal reading, writing, and methodological practices.


Warning: This course incorporates mature themes. Some of the texts we’ll read include representations of graphic violence and/or deal with racism in troubling ways. Please be certain you are willing and able to discuss this kind of material in a mature and respectful way.

Assignments will likely include:

  • Weekly close reading posts
  • Weekly annotations
  • Weekly participation in one class Zoom (Fridays)
  • Research proposal and bibliography for senior capstone research essay
  • Capstone research essay

 

Our course texts will likely include:

  • Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World
  • Arthur Conan Doyle, The Poison Belt
  • H. Rider Haggard, She
  • Pauline Hopkins, Of One Blood: Or, the Hidden Self
  • H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau
  • Short, required primary texts and secondary readings on Canvas as PDFs


Films:

  • Ryan Coogler, Black Panther
  • John Huston, The Man Who Would be King
  • Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, Westworld Season 1
  • Steven Spielberg, Jurassic Park
  • Simon West, Lara Croft, Tomb Raider

 

20460 TR 10:00-11:50 am Lee, Jean

Water in Black Literature: Water is a central trope in African American and Caribbean Literature and functions as a site of memory and subject formation. Its fluidity transgresses borders and connects the globe through its currents, even bridging this world to the otherworld of the afterlife. It provides routes and roots for departing, returning, mourning, preserving, and becoming the Black diaspora in the Americas. This class will explore how seas, oceans, rivers, streams, lakes, hurricanes, and floods inform African American and Caribbean reclamations of ancestors and their counter histories, and function as witnesses to contemporary racial injustice. We will focus on ecocritical, postcolonial, and feminist readings of representations of the Middle Passage and Caribbean Sea as womb and grave, mangroves as theoretical sites of rhizomatic relations, the Gulf coast, Mississippi Delta, and Ohio River as conduits of destruction and renewal, and all the above as homes of African Atlantic water deities.

20470 TR 02:00-03:50 pm, meets as class needs. Metzger, Mary J.

Shakespeare and Race: In this course we will explore racialization in Shakespeare’s work and cultural context, the post-hoc racialization of Shakespeare’s work in the production of colonization, and the appropriation and revision of Shakespeare’s work by Black Americans. We’ll develop a shared understanding of racialization in and following the English 16th and 17th century in which Shakespeare wrote, the ways in which Shakespeare’s work has been deployed to advance white supremacy since then, and the ways in which particularly writers, actors and other artists of color, have appropriated and challenged this particular view of his work.

Plays include: The Merchant of Venice, Titus Andronicus, Othello, American Moor by Keith Hamilton Cobb, and Desdemona by Toni Morrison as well as other readings, podcasts and videos. We are scheduled to meet T/R but will be using this time both synchronously and asynchronously as suits our needs.

Assignments: As a senior seminar this course will involve a lot of reading/viewing, informal writing, and collaboration that results in a final 10-page seminar paper or its alternative equivalent.

 

ENG 423 Maj Auth: 5cr

Notes &Prerequisites: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371; possible additional prerequisites relevant to topic. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20275 MWF 10:00-11:20 am Laffrado, Laura

Ella Higginson: This major authors seminar looks at the writings of once celebrated but now long forgotten author Ella Rhoads Higginson, the first prominent literary writer from the Pacific Northwest and the first Poet Laureate of Washington State. Higginson was celebrated for her award-winning fiction, her lyric poetry which was set to music and performed internationally, and her prolific nonfiction. During the turn from the nineteenth century into the twentieth century, readers across the nation were introduced to the then-remote Pacific Northwest region by Higginson’s descriptions of majestic mountains, vast forests, and scenic waters, as well as the often difficult economic circumstances of those dwelling near Puget Sound. We will read her major works in the order she wrote them, pay attention to their interactions with the larger culture, watch her create characters who help define the Pacific Northwest, and ask why Higginson became so famous. We will consider issues of gender, race, region, and identity, among others.

ASSIGNMENTS: This will be a small class devoted to reading and writing. Much reading and thinking will be asked of you, along with regular class participation, oral responses, and a fifteen-page seminar paper, due at the end of the term. As part of the seminar paper process, expect draft days and in-class writing.

EVALUATION: Final grades will be based on the research paper, oral responses, class participation, and attendance.

TEXTS:

  • Selected Writings of Ella Higginson: Inventing Pacific Northwest Literature.
  • Mariella, of Out-West (1902).
  • Alaska, the Great Country (1908).

We will also look at letters, essays, book reviews, and other fascinating Higginson material (original copies of magazines Higginson published in, postcards, sheet music, paper weights engraved with her poetry) to help us understand how to read Higginson and why it matters.

20533 MW 01:00-02:20 pm, some F optional. Giffen, Allison A.

Emily Dickinson: This course offers an intensive study of the work of Emily Dickinson. While the poems will always be our central focus, we will read them in the context of Dickinson's biography as well as her cultural, historical and literary moment. In addition, we will be attending to Dickinson’s idiosyncratic methods of literary production and distribution. We will look to her use of variants, her decision to bind her poems into handmade chapbooks called “fascicles,” and her inclusion of hundreds of poems into her letters. We will also consider the editorial decisions that went into the many and varied editions of Dickinson’s poetry as we read the poems in manuscript as well as print.

 

ENG 441 Language and the Sec Classroom 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301, ENG 302 or ENG 371; ENG 347; ENG 350, ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354; two from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, ENG 311, ENG 317, ENG 318, ENG 319, ENG 320 and ENG 321. Co-requisite: ENG 443.

23639 MW 10:00-11:20 am, F asynchronous. VanderStaay, Steven L.

This course will explore language structure and use in the Secondary English classroom, including cultural and equity issues that linguistically diverse students face in secondary schools, dialect and discourse style bias, second language acquisition, and the challenge of grammar, conventions, and high-stakes testing. This is a writing and reading intensive course which requires the commitment, dedication, and professionalism that you will need in your future work as a teacher.

This course must be taken concurrently with ENG 443 unless the instructor approves otherwise.

Assignments may include:

  • Miscellaneous Writing Responses
  • Mini-lessons (Written and Performative)
  • Inquiry-Based Research Project and Presentation
  • Language Pedagogy in Practice: Review Presentation
  • Sequenced Language-Based Mini-Unit

Texts May Include:

  • Anderson, Catherine. Essentials of Linguistics. (Free OER text)
  • Crovitz, Darren, and Michelle D. Devereaux. Grammar to get things done: A practical guide for teachers anchored in real-world usage. Taylor & Francis, 2016.
  • Supplemental Canvas readings from a variety of sources, including
  • Espana and Herrera, En Comunidad: Lessons for Centering the Voices and Experiences of Latinx Students

 

ENG 443 Tch Eng Lang Arts in Sec Sch I 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 301, ENG 302 or ENG 371; ENG 347; ENG 350; and two courses from: ENG 307, ENG 308, ENG 309, ENG 310, ENG 311, ENG 317, ENG 318, ENG 319, ENG 320 and ENG 321. Co-requisite: ENG 441. WP3.

20796 MW 08:30-09:50 am, F asynchronous. VanderStaay, Steven L.

This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence that is designed to help you become a critical, knowledgeable, and effective teacher of English language arts at the secondary level. In this first quarter, we emphasize the teaching of writing, though oral performance, literature, and media will be integrally linked. Through examining theories of writing development and related pedagogical practices, we will investigate strategies for teaching writing in diverse and multilingual settings. Together, we will explore how to connect what we know about ourselves as language arts learners and educators with the creation of useable teaching materials that serve the needs of a diverse population of students. This is a writing and reading intensive course which requires the same kind of individual initiative, dedication, and professionalism that you will apply to your future work as a teacher.

Assignments may include:

  • Miscellaneous Writing Responses and Creative Writing
  • Mini-lessons (Written and Performative)
  • Writing Pedagogy in Practice Presentation
  • Sequenced Writing-Based Unit Plan

Texts May Include:

  • Gallagher, Kelly. Write like this: Teaching real-world writing through modeling & mentor texts. Stenhouse Publishers, 2011
  • Christensen and Watson, Rhythm and Resistance: Teaching Poetry for Social Justice
  • Goebel, Bruce. Teaching English Language Arts in the Secondary School
  • Canvas readings from a variety of texts

 

ENG 444 Tch Eng Lang Art in Sec Sch II 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 443

20087 W 10:00-11:20 am, MF asynchronous. Hardman, Pam

CONTENT: This course focuses on the teaching of skills related to reading, interpretation, and critical analysis of literature and other media in secondary school classrooms. The course will also address the specifics of lesson and unit planning.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assigned reading; lesson plans; discussion plan and performance; unit plan

POSSIBLE TEXTS: Kelly Gallagher, Deeper Reading; Kelly Gallagher and Penny Kittle, 180 Days; Isabel Quintero, Gabi, A Girl in Pieces

 

ENG 451 Creative Wrtng Seminar:Fiction 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20155 M 11:30-12:50 pm, WF asynchronous. Colen, Elizabeth Jane

In this advanced workshop in fiction writing, students will closely read and analyze books of short stories written in the last year, engage in weekly writing exercises and imitations, and hone their storytelling skills through the production of at least one fully revised story. The final project will be a portfolio that includes a story of 10-15 pages of fully revised, well-crafted work.

20616 W 01:00-02:20 pm, MF asynchronous. Westhoff, Kami Dawn Marie

Welcome to English 451! This course is designed to encourage you to continue your exploration into the complex world of creating literary fiction. We will read the work of contemporary fiction writers and examine the ways in which they create compelling and innovative fiction through careful and unique attention to such elements as character development, setting, theme, format, and narrative focus. In addition to extensive fiction writing, you will be asked to engage with the literary world on a larger scale, including online literary journal research, “Live” literature viewing, and taking part in the process of submitting your own work. Showcasing your knowledge and creativity, you will produce a chapbook of your work as your final project.

 

ENG 453 Creative Wrtng Seminar: Poetry 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 353. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20461 MW 01:00-02:20 pm, F asynchronous. Wong, Jane

“Poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” - Audre Lorde

English 453 offers you an opportunity to delve deeper into your creative skills and spend dedicated time close reading the work of other poets – particularly your fellow poets in class. This course asks you to experiment with different craft moves through generative writing, delve deeper into the particularities of a poet’s work, reflect on rigorous revision and feedback, and articulate your own poetics. You will be writing lots of poems, offering feedback for your peers, exploring the work of single authors in-depth, and crafting a poetics essay of your own. Some questions we will wrestle with throughout the quarter include: where is the “heart” of the poem? What formal techniques do poets employ (or break) to achieve a particular experience and why? What is the relationship between form and content? What are the stakes of poetry today? When someone asks you the question “what do you write about?” (and they always will!), how will you respond? We will examine the craft of poetry (inherited and invented forms, lineation, rhythm, repetition, word play, image, metaphor, hybrid forms, etc.) in the larger context of poetics: why poems exist, how they create and resist meaning, how they create different experiences for readers and why.

In addition to writing our own poems, we will engage critical essays on poetics as helpful frameworks (i.e. essays and letters from poets such as Audre Lorde, Federico Garcia Lorca, Emily Dickinson, Ross Gay, Aimé Césaire, Solmaz Sharif, and more), focus on the work of rising/prominent contemporary poets, and craft a chapbook collection as a culmination of our creative risk-taking. English 453 seeks to consider poetry not as a dusty old book, but as something alive, current, and full of potential today.

English 453 is a blended synchronous and asynchronous course. We will be meeting synchronously on Zoom on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-2:20pm.

 

ENG 454 Creative Wrtg Sem: Nonfiction 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 354. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20285 WF 10:00-11:20 am, M asynchronous. Colen, Elizabeth Jane

In this advanced workshop in nonfiction writing, students will closely read and analyze books of essays and memoir written in the last year, engage in weekly writing exercises and imitations, and hone their writing skills through the production of at least one fully revised essay. The final project will be a portfolio that includes an essay of 10-15 pages of fully revised, well-crafted work.

21619 TR 09:00-09:50 am Gulyas, Lee R.

In French, the word essayer means “to try.” Essays are malleable. They shift and change and surprise. Even though the material for an essay may come from real life, we can shape it, speculate, research, meditate, and explore in order to render the world through voice and form. Through intensive engagement we’ll explore experiments in creative nonfiction from a wide variety of authors and attempt a few of our own. We will deliberate, discuss, and dissect. We will take apart paragraphs and sentences. We will become intimate with syntax and rhythm and re-examine the “big picture.” We will use these lessons and craft elements to breathe new life into our own work. This course is a study of literature and craft essays as well, so be prepared to do both scholarly and creative work.

Texts: All readings will be online or provided by the instructor.

 

ENG 459 Editing and Publishing 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20517 TR 12:00-01:00 pm Gulyas, Lee R.

This is a capstone course that offers an overview of publishing in the United States. Our explorations include the history of publishing; the wide variety of publishing houses and presses; literary careers and the business of publishing; and the literary Northwest.

COURSE GOALS
As upper-level writing students, you will:

  • explore the world of publishing and its place in our culture.
  • be introduced to skills including research, sources, copyediting, and proofreading, and be aware of the current literary conversation, discourses, and cultures of editing and publishing.
  • consider writing from the perspective of writer, editor, and publisher within the context of the industry, and be familiar with the roles of each.
  • understand how a book is made—from inception, to production, distribution, and promotion.
  • be familiar with some of the ethical issues and current trends in publishing, the politics of book buying, and how to engage and flourish as a member of a larger literary community.
  • actively work to increase your knowledge and skills and aim for professional standards.

Texts:

  • Eckstut, Arielle, and David Sterry. The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published, How To Write It, Sell It, and Market It—Successfully! New York: Workman Publishing, 2015
  • Saller, Carol Fisher. The Subversive Copy Editor. Second Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2016.

 

ENG 460 MultiGenre: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20790 WF 01:00-02:20 pm, M occasional meetings. Yeasting, Jeanne Ellen

CONTENT: This course will focus on creating and revising prose poetry, lyric creative nonfiction, and hybrids of the two. We’ll investigate the line is between prose and poetry, and explore the boundaries between "regular" poetry with line breaks, prose poetry, and “poetic" creative nonfiction. We’ll read the work of some earlier practitioners of these forms, as well as contemporary authors. Class will include a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises, and workshops.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assignments include considerable reading of writing models; weekly writing and revising of prose poetry, lyric creative nonfiction, and/or hybrids; giving detailed peer feedback using guidelines; posting to a weekly reading response forum; and completing a Final project. Students may be required to work on a collaborative project and/or conduct research.

EVALUATION: Based primarily on active and attentive class participation and fulfillment of assignments, including a Final Project.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Ray Gonzalez, ed. No Boundaries: Prose Poems by 24 Americans. Tupelo Press (2003).
    Paperback ISBN: 978-1932195019
  • Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1998).
    Paperback ISBN: 978-0156453806; digital version available
  • Carol Guess, Doll Studies: Forensics. Black Lawrence Press (2012).
    Paperback: ISBN: 978-1936873166
  • Anna Maria Hong, H & G. Sidebrow Books (2018).
    Paperback ISBN: 978-1940090085
  • Maggie Nelson, Bluets. Wave Books (2009).
    Paperback ISBN: 978-1933517407
  • Selected texts and handouts on Canvas

 

ENG 460 MultiGenreWrtg: 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

20436 MW 02:30-03:50 pm Wong, Jane

“Good food writing evokes the senses” – Samin Nosrat

In this multi-genre class, we will delve into the theme of food – including the intimate sensory memories and sociopolitical implications that food and eating evokes. We will generate new work engaging food rituals and desires, celebrating the power and intricacies of our unique food histories. How can writing through and about food strengthen our communities and open up our creative craft in surprising ways? As a generative and workshop based class, we will closely read and pursue a variety of hybrid approaches, thinking about food traditions, food trends, medicinal food, food production, food justice, food science, restaurant work, and more. These creative texts will cross genre and disciplinary boundaries, including (but not limited to): poems, nonfiction essays, short stories, media, book arts, and more. Some writers include Hanif Abdurraqib, Destiny Birdsong, Craig Santos Perez, M.F.K Fisher, Michelle Zauner, Li-Young Lee, and Joy Harjo. As writers and artists, we will dig into our food histories, cultures, and sensory experiences by experimenting with multi-genre and hybrid forms – forms that are neither/nor, defy definition, and celebrate invention. We will push genre boundaries while still paying close attention to craft and revision. As we explore hybrid forms through the focus on food, we will deeply reflect on our creative processes and consider the relationship between form and content. Along with creative writing exercises and workshop feedback letters, you will be creating a final project – in a medium (or mediums) of your choosing – featuring new and revised work.

English 460 is a blended synchronous and asynchronous course. We will be meeting synchronously on Zoom on Mondays and Wednesdays from 2:30pm-3:50pm.

 

ENG 462 Prof Wrtg 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: One course from ENG 301, ENG 302, ENG 371; or equivalent experience and instructor approval. Major restrictions lift on February 26th, at 4:30pm.

23865 R 10:00-11:50 am, T asynchronous. Brown, Nicole

At its essence, grant writing is the applied rhetoric of matching visions, missions, objectives, and goals so that an idea or desired change will receive support and funding. Over the course of the quarter, you will be introduced to the rhetorical situation and principles of grant writing in theory and practice -- as both a profession and a habit-of-mind.

Drawing on the broad usefulness of understanding grant writing, this project-based, service learning course covers the process of grant and proposal development, including identifying achievable funding opportunities, researching and assessing funding sources, proposal writing, and preparation of a full grant package for submission.

By June, you will have completed a grant proposal/application requesting funding for a cause and/or organization that you care about.

 

ENG 466 Screenwriting 5cr

Notes & Prerequisites: ENG 364 or one from: ENG 350, ENG 351, ENG 353 or ENG 354. All major restrictions lift on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

23642 MW 10:00-11:20 am, F asynchronous. Youmans, Greg

The course introduces screenwriting with an emphasis on the art of storytelling. We will focus on the writing of narrative screenplays, both short and feature-length. To guide our efforts, we will explore and analyze a range of examples, both as screenplays and as final films, ranging from art cinema to quirky indies to mainstream Hollywood movies. Although our focus will be on linear narrative storytelling, we may also look at examples of screenwriting for other genres and formats, such as television, online video, and interactive storytelling.

You will often work collaboratively in class on exercises geared toward developing stories, characters, dialogue, and screenplays. Although some time will be set aside for in-class writing, most of our time together will be devoted to inspiring and guiding the projects you’ll be working on outside of class. The term will culminate in substantial work toward a full treatment and at least ten pages of a feature-length screenplay.

 

Graduate Courses

 

ENG 504 Seminar in Writing of Poetry 5c

23643 TR 06:00-07:50 pm Shipley, Ely

In this course, we will work from the basis that in order to become better writers, we also must become better readers, and that the practice of writing is our greatest teacher. We will explore contemporary developments poetry, focusing specifically on form’s relationship to content. You will submit original work and offer thoughtful observations to each work discussed. We become better writers through reading, thinking and feeling intensely, learning from our own work, the work of others, and above all, by practicing.

MA students can register on Tuesday, March 2nd, at 9am.

 

ENG 525 Studies in Fiction 5cr

23644 TR 10:00-11:50 am, participation encourage however asynchronous option is available. Araki-Kawaguchi, Hiroki

As a participant in this course, we will ask you to develop fictional worlds, characters and predicaments. We will have conversations about the fundamental elements of fiction (e.g. tense, pov, dialog, voice, conflict), as we examine both a diverse body of published work and the early drafts by your peers.

Expect this to be an exciting and challenging course. We hope you will develop new ways of thinking, working, writing and communicating. We hope you will take risks. You do not have to write magnificent fiction to do well in this course. You will have to be brave, respectful and a hard worker.

Participation in a 5-credit course is equivalent to 150 hours of work over the quarter. This will include 4 hours of classroom time weekly (lecture, discussions, workshop) and approximately 10 hours of outside preparation (reading, writing, investigating, reflecting, projects). You are also encouraged to visit me in office hours, attend (online) literary events, and connect (online) with your peers.

Required reading to include Wonderbook by Jeff VanderMeer, Making Comics by Lynda Barry, If the Body Allows It by Megan Cummins, and course handouts. I am also asking that you find access to a portable electronic device that will allow you to listen to a podcast and move simultaneously (e.g. walk or dance).

 

ENG 560 Studies in British Literature 5cr

23827 TR 04:00-05:50 pm, contact professor for schedule queries. Loar, Christopher F.

Sex and Gender in the Long Eighteenth Century

This course examines a range of literatures from the 1660s through the 1770s to explore transformations in the sex/gender system in the Anglophone world. It's long been a truism that this was a period of crucial developments in the fashioning of Euro-British genders and sexualities: traditionally, it has been identified with the emergence of domesticity and companionate marriage; the solidifying of identities around heterosexual forms of desire; and the stabilizing of a narrow range of femininities and masculinities. Recent scholarship has extended and, in some cases, challenged these understandings of the dynamics of gender and sexuality in this period, drawing on newer theorizations of queerness, transness, and disability. We will read some exemplary texts that engage sharply with questions of gender and sex--some highly canonical, some less so--to better understand how prestigious and popular forms of writing responded to and reimagined sex and gender in this dynamic period.

Rather than attempting a chronological survey, the course will be organized around several topics, including libertine sexualities, domesticity and heteronormativity, and colonial sexualities, among others.

Texts:

  • Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works
  • Samuel Richardson, Pamela: Or Virtue Rewarded
  • Eliza Haywood, Anti-Pamela/Fielding, Shamela
  • Prince, History of Mary Prince
  • Other readings available through library, Canvas, or online.

 

ENG 580 Studies in Film 5cr

23646 R 02:00-03:50 pm Odabasi, Eren

This graduate seminar explores multiple theoretical approaches to spirituality in global cinema. Since Paul Schrader first formulated the transcendental style in the early 1970s, several scholars have inquired about what makes certain films contemplative, profound or spiritual. How do films move beyond questions of narrative progression or ideology to explore universal, timeless, and often abstract themes about the human condition? In order to answer this question, Gilles Deleuze developed the notion of “time-image” while Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky made a series of poetic, unclassifiable films about time, faith, and the human soul before writing a book that summarized his approach to cinema. Then the “slow cinema” movement emerged, utilizing stillness and filmic duration to create a similar, albeit distinct sense of spirituality and transcendence.

What are the common thematic and stylistic elements that characterize cinematic portrayals of spirituality? This seminar aims to offer a range of possible answers to this question by tracing the lineage outlined above. Throughout the quarter, we will discuss canonical films by various important directors and work towards a mid-length research paper.

OPTIONAL: Assignments / Evaluation

OPTIONAL: Texts

BOOKS
Required:

  • Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer. Paul Schrader, University of California Press, 2018.
  • Sculpting in Time. Andrei Tarkovsky, University of Texas Press, 1989.


Optional:

  • Poetics of Slow Cinema: Nostalgia, Absurdism, Boredom. Emre Caglayan, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.


FILMS (All available online)

  • Solaris, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972
  • The Mirror, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975
  • Stalker, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979
  • An Autumn Afternoon, directed by Yasujiro Ozu, 1962
  • Au Hasard Balthazar, directed by Robert Bresson, 1966
  • Ordet, directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1955
  • Winter Light, directed by Ingmar Bergman, 1963
  • Tree of Wooden Clogs, directed by Ermanno Olmi, 1978
  • The Turin Horse, directed by Bela Tarr, 2011

 

ENG 598 Sem Tch Eng: 5cr

22074 TR 12:00-01:50 pm Trueblood, Kathryn R.

Description: Welcome writers and teachers! We will be engaged in a discussion of the paradoxes particular to the field of Creative Writing: Is it a studio art, a healing art, or an academic field? Or all of the above: a hybrid.

In addition to introducing you to historical and controversial pedagogical practices within academe, we will investigate under what circumstances the workshop is a source of inspiration and when it is a force for homogeneity. We will examine the role creative writing plays in specific communities outside academe for the purposes of personal growth, social advocacy, and health.

This course will give graduate students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience as we team up with introductory creative writing courses on campus. We will be hearing from professors of introductory courses, guest speakers in community education, and teachers in secondary education as we consider how to align the goals of creative writing with a host organization.

Formal Assignments: a role-play lesson, a teaching demonstration, a creative writing textbook review, a syllabus with reflection, a personal teaching statement.

Texts:

  • Writing Alone and With Others by Pat Schneider (Oxford University Press)
  • A series of articles about racism and class in creative writing pedagogy by David Mura, Gloria Anzaldua, Cathy Park Hong, Craig Perez, and Claudia Rankine, among others.
  • A craft book of your choosing to be selected from the class bibliography